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Adjustment disorder: implications for ICD-11 and DSM-5

  • Patricia Casey (a1) and Anne Doherty (a2)

Summary

Adjustment disorder has been a recognised disorder for decades but has been the subject of little epidemiological research. Now researchers have identified the prevalence of adjustment disorder in primary care, and found general practitioner recognition very low but with high rates of antidepressant prescribing. Possible reasons for the seemingly low prevalence, recognition rate and inappropriate management include its recognition as a residual category in diagnostic instruments and poor delineation from other disorders or from normal stress responses. These problems could be rectified in ICD-11 and DSM-5 if changes according it full syndromal status, among others, were made. This would have an impact on future research.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Professor Patricia Casey, Mater Misericordiae Univerity Hospital, Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland. Email: apsych@mater.ie

Footnotes

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See pp. 137–142, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Adjustment disorder: implications for ICD-11 and DSM-5

  • Patricia Casey (a1) and Anne Doherty (a2)

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Adjustment disorder: implications for ICD-11 and DSM-5

  • Patricia Casey (a1) and Anne Doherty (a2)
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