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An integrated biopsychosocial model of childhood maltreatment and psychosis

  • Victoria Barker (a1), Andrew Gumley (a2), Matthias Schwannauer (a3) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a3)
Summary

There is now a well-established link between childhood maltreatment and psychosis. It is, however, unclear what the mechanisms are by which this occurs. Here, we propose a pathway linking the experience of childhood maltreatment with biological changes in the brain and suggest a psychological intervention to ameliorate its effects.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Victoria Barker, University of Edinburgh, 48 Duddingston Park, Edinburgh EH15 1JY, UK. Email: victoria.barker@ed.ac.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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An integrated biopsychosocial model of childhood maltreatment and psychosis

  • Victoria Barker (a1), Andrew Gumley (a2), Matthias Schwannauer (a3) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a3)
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