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The case for cothymia: mixed anxiety and depression as a single diagnosis

  • Peter Tyrer (a1)
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Meltzer, H., Gill, B. & Petticrew, M. (1994) OPCS Surveys of Psychiatric Morbidity in Great Britain. Bulletin No. I: The Prevalence of Psychiatric Morbidity among Adults Aged 16–64, Living in Private Households, in Great Britain. London: OPCS.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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The case for cothymia: mixed anxiety and depression as a single diagnosis

  • Peter Tyrer (a1)
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