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Crisis card following self-harm: 12-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

  • Jonathan Evans (a1), Mark Evans (a2), H. Gethin Morgan (a3), Alan Hayward (a4) and David Gunnell (a5)...
Summary
Summary

No intervention has been shown to be effective in preventing repetition of self-harm. In the 6-month follow-up of a large randomised controlled trial, we previously reported no effectiveness of the provision of a card offering 24-h crisis telephone consultation on repetition of self-harm. However, there was a possible benefit among those presenting following a first episode (OR=0.64, 95% CI 0.34–1.22). Here we report the 12-month follow-up of the trial. The results confirm no overall benefit of the intervention (OR=1.19, 95% CI 0.85–1.67). Among those with a first episode of self-harm, the possible benefit of the intervention had diminished (OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.52–1.52), although a modest effect cannot be excluded.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr J. Evans, Consultant Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychiatry University of Bristol, Cotham House, Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6JL, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 117 9546635; fax: +44 (0) 117 9546672; e-mail: j.evans@bristol.ac.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Bennewith O., Stocks N., Gunnell D., et al (2002) General practice based intervention to prevent repeat episodes of deliberate self-harm: cluster randomised controlled trial. BMJ, 324, 12541257.
Department of Health (1999) A National Service Framework for Mental Health. London: Department of Health.
Evans J., Johnson C., Stanton R., et al (1996) How to establish case registers: II. Non-fatal deliberate self-harm. Psychiatric Bulletin, 20, 403405.
Evans M. O., Morgan H. G., Hayward A., et al (1999) Crisis telephone consultation for deliberate self-harm patients: effects on repetition. British Journal of Psychiatry, 175, 2327.
Guthrie E., Kapur N., Mackway-Jones K., et al (2001) Randomised controlled trial of brief psychological intervention alter deliberate self poisoning. BMJ, 323, 135138.
Hawton K., Arensman E., Townsend E., et al (1998) Deliberate self harm: systematic review of efficacy of psychosocial and pharmacological treatments in preventing repetition. BMJ, 317, 441447.
Tyrer P., Thompson S., Schmidt U., et al (2003) Randomized controlled trial of brief cognitive behaviour therapy versus treatment as usual in recurrent deliberate self-harm: the POPMACT study. Psychological Medicine, 33, 969976.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Crisis card following self-harm: 12-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

  • Jonathan Evans (a1), Mark Evans (a2), H. Gethin Morgan (a3), Alan Hayward (a4) and David Gunnell (a5)...
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