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Cultural differences in stigma surrounding schizophrenia: Comparison between Central Europe and North Africa

  • Matthias C. Angermeyer (a1), Mauro G. Carta (a2), Herbert Matschinger (a3), Aurélie Millier (a4), Tarek Refaï (a5), Georg Schomerus (a6) and Mondher Toumi (a7)...
Abstract
Background

Exploring cultural differences may improve understanding about the social processes underlying the stigmatisation of people with mental illness.

Aims

To compare public beliefs and attitudes about schizophrenia in Central Europe and North Africa.

Method

Representative national population surveys conducted in Germany (2011) and in Tunisia (2012), using the same interview mode (face to face) and the same fully structured interview.

Results

In Tunisia, respondents showed a stronger tendency to hold the person with schizophrenia responsible for the condition. At the same time they expressed more prosocial reactions and less fear than their German counterparts. In Germany, the desire for social distance was greater for more distant relationships, whereas in Tunisia this was the case for close, family-related relationships.

Conclusions

Stigma differs between Tunisia and Germany more in form than in magnitude. It manifests particularly in those social roles which ‘matter most’ to people within a given culture.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Matthias C. Angermeyer, Center for Public Mental Health, Untere Zeile 13 A-3482 Gösing am Wagram, Austria. Email: angermeyer@aon.at
Footnotes
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These authors contributed equally to this work.

The survey in Germany was funded by the Fritz-Thyssen-Stiftung (Az. 10.11.2.175)

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
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Cultural differences in stigma surrounding schizophrenia: Comparison between Central Europe and North Africa

  • Matthias C. Angermeyer (a1), Mauro G. Carta (a2), Herbert Matschinger (a3), Aurélie Millier (a4), Tarek Refaï (a5), Georg Schomerus (a6) and Mondher Toumi (a7)...
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