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Forensic mental health

  • Paul E. Mullen (a1)
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References

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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Forensic mental health

  • Paul E. Mullen (a1)
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eLetters

The Duality of Forensic Psychiatry

Harold A. Maio, advocate
06 May 2004

Forensic Psychiatry is that branch of the study of psychiatry that serves court systems, court systems that require fully adversarial representation in pursuing justice. That is, each side of an argument is presented, ideally, with equal power and expertise.

In that pursuit, forensic psychiatrists may elect to represent eitherside of a particular argument, the prosecution or the defense, and must represent that point of view with equal expert opinion.

Does forensic psychiatry serve the master, court procedure, or its own ethic becomes a serious topic for discussion. There is no simple answer.

Harold A. Maio
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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