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Immigration and schizophrenia: the social causation hypothesis revisited

  • Brian Cooper (a1)
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References

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Brooke, E. M. (1959) A national study of schizophrenic patients in relation to occupation. In Second International Congress for Psychiatry, Zurich 1957: Congress Report, vol.3, pp.5263. Zurich: Orelli Fussli.
Cooper, B. (1961) Social class and prognosis in schizophrenia. British Journal of Preventive and Social Medicine, 15, 1741.
Eaton, W. W., Mortensen, P. B. & Frydenberg, M. (2000) Obstetric factors, urbanization and psychosis. Schizophrenia Research, 43, 117123.
Fearon, P., Jones, P. B., Kennedy, N., et al (2004) Raised incidence of psychosis in all migrant groups in South London, Nottingham and Bristol: the ÆSOP Study. Schizophrenia Research, 67 (suppl. 1), 15.
Goldberg, E. M. & Morrison, S. L. (1963) Schizophrenia and social class. British Journal of Psychiatry, 108, 785802.
Harrison, G., Gunnell, D., Glazebrook, C., et al (2001) Association between schizophrenia and social inequality at birth: case–control study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, 346350.
Hjern, A., Wicks, S. & Dalman, C. (2004) Social adversity contributes to high morbidity in psychoses in immigrants – a national cohort study in two generations of Swedish residents. Psychological Medicine, 34, 10251033.
Jablensky, A. (2000) Epidemiology of schizophrenia: the global burden of disease and disability. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 250, 274285.
Jarvis, E. (1998) Schizophrenia in British immigrants. Recent findings, issues and implications. Transcultural Psychiatry, 35, 3974.
Rutter, M., Yule, E., Morton, J., et al (1975) Children of West Indian immigrants –III. Home circumstances and family patterns. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 16, 105123.
Sharpley, M. S., Hutchinson, G., Murray, R. M., et al (2001) Understanding the excess of psychosis among the African –Caribbean population in England. Review of current hypotheses. British Journal of Psychiatry, 178 (suppl. 40), s60s68.
Takei, N., Persaud, R., Woodruff, P., et al (1998) First episodes of psychosis in Afro-Caribbean and White people. An 18-year follow-up population-based study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 172, 147153.
Whitehead, M., Townsend, P. & Davidson, N. (eds) (1992) Inequalities in Health: The Black Report and The Health Divide. Harmondsworth: Penguin.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Immigration and schizophrenia: the social causation hypothesis revisited

  • Brian Cooper (a1)
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