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Incidence and predictors of mental ill-health in adults with intellectual disabilities: Prospective study

  • Elita Smiley (a1), Sally-Ann Cooper (a1), Janet Finlayson (a1), Alison Jackson (a1), Linda Allan (a1), Dipali Mantry (a2), Catherine McGrother (a3), Alex McConnachie (a4) and Jillian Morrison (a5)...

Abstract

Background

The point prevalence of mental ill-health among adults with intellectual disabilities is 40.9%, but its incidence is unknown.

Aims

To determine the incidence and possible predictors of mental ill-health.

Method

Prospective cohort study to measure mental ill-health in adults with mild to profound intellectual disabilities.

Results

Cohort retention was 70% (n=651). The 2-year incidence of mental ill-health was 16.3% (12.6% excluding problem behaviours, and 4.6% for problem behaviours) and the standardised incidence ratio was 1.87 (95%CI1.51 2.28). Factors related to incident mental ill-health have some similarities with those in the general population, but also important differences. Type of accommodation and support, previous mental ill-health, urinary incontinence, not having impaired mobility, more severe intellectual disabilities, adult abuse, parental divorce in childhood and preceding life events predicted incident ill-health; however, deprivation, other childhood abuse or adversity, daytime occupation, and marital and smoking status did not.

Conclusions

This is a first step towards intervention trials, and identifying sub-populations for more proactive measures. Public health strategy and policy that is appropriate for this population should be developed.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Professor Sally-Ann Cooper, Section of Psychological Medicine, Division of Community Based Sciences, University of Glasgow, Academic Centre, Gartnavel Royal Hospital, 1055 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0XH, UK. Tel: +44(0)141 211 0690; fax +44(0)141 3574899; email: SACooper@clinmed.gla.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes

References

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Incidence and predictors of mental ill-health in adults with intellectual disabilities: Prospective study

  • Elita Smiley (a1), Sally-Ann Cooper (a1), Janet Finlayson (a1), Alison Jackson (a1), Linda Allan (a1), Dipali Mantry (a2), Catherine McGrother (a3), Alex McConnachie (a4) and Jillian Morrison (a5)...
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