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Incidence, correlates and predictors of post-traumatic stress disorder in the pregnancy after stillbirth

  • P. Turton (a1), P. Hughes (a1), C. D. H. Evans (a2) and D. Fainman (a3)
Abstract
Background

Many women may suffer psychological symptoms after stillbirth and in the subsequent pregnancy. Stillbirth has not been demonstrated previously to be a stressor for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Aims

To assess incidence, correlates and predictors of PTSD during and after the pregnancy following stillbirth.

Method

A cohort study of pregnant women whose previous pregnancy ended in stillbirth.

Results

PTSD symptoms were prevalent in the pregnancy following stillbirth. Case-level PTSD was associated with depression, state-anxiety and conception occurring closer to loss. Symptomsgenerally resolved naturally by 1 year postpartum (birth of healthy baby).

Conclusions

Women are vulnerabe to PTSD in the pregnancy subsequent to stillbirth, particularly when conception occurs soon after the loss.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr P. Turton, Department of Psychiatry, St George's Hospital Medical School, London SW17 0RE. E-mail: p.turton@sghms.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

The study was funded by SouthThames West R&D, the Simenauer Trust, Tommy's Campaign and the Charles Skey charitable trust. The authors have no personal interest in these organisations.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
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Incidence, correlates and predictors of post-traumatic stress disorder in the pregnancy after stillbirth

  • P. Turton (a1), P. Hughes (a1), C. D. H. Evans (a2) and D. Fainman (a3)
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