Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Negative childhood experiences and mental health: theoretical, clinical and primary prevention implications

  • John Read (a1) and Richard P. Bentall (a2)
Summary
Summary

After decades of ignoring or minimising the prevalence and effects of negative events in childhood, researchers have recently established that a broad range of adverse childhood events are significant risk factors for most mental health problems, including psychosis. Researchers are now investigating the biological and psychological mechanisms involved. In addition to the development of a traumagenic neurodevelopmental model for psychosis, the exploration of a range of psychological processes, including attachment and dissociation, is shedding light on the specific aetiologies of discrete phenomena such as hallucinations and delusions. It is argued that the theoretical, clinical and primary prevention implications of our belated focus on childhood are profound.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Negative childhood experiences and mental health: theoretical, clinical and primary prevention implications
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Negative childhood experiences and mental health: theoretical, clinical and primary prevention implications
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Negative childhood experiences and mental health: theoretical, clinical and primary prevention implications
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Professor John Read, Department of Psychology, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand. Email: j.read@auckland.ac.nz
Footnotes
Hide All

See pp. 107–115, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Keyes KM, Eaton NR, Krueger RF, McLaughlin KA, Wall MM, Grant BF, et al. Child maltreatment and the structure of common psychiatric disorders. Br J Psychiatry 2012; 200: 107–15.
2 Kessler RC, McLaughlin KA, Greif Green J, Gruber MJ, Sampson NA, Zaslavsky AM, et al. Childhood adversities and adult psychopathology in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Br J Psychiatry 2010; 197: 378–85.
3 Read J, Bentall RP, Fosse R. Time to abandon the bio-bio-bio model of psychosis: exploring the epigenetic and psychological mechanisms by which adverse life events lead to psychotic symptoms. Epidemiol Psichiatr Soc 2009; 18: 299310.
4 Wilkinson R, Pickett K. The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. Penguin Books, 2010.
5 Read J, Haslam N, Sayce L, Davies E. Prejudice and schizophrenia: a review of the ‘Mental illness is an Illness like any other’ approach. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2006; 114: 303–18.
6 Janssen I, Krabbendam L, Bak M, Hanssen M, Vollebergh W, De Graaf R, et al. Childhood abuse as a risk factor for psychotic experiences. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2004; 109: 3845.
7 Cutajar M, Mullen P, Ogloff J, Thomas S, Wells D, Spataro J. Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders in a cohort of sexually abused children. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2010; 67: 1114–9.
8 Bebbington P. Childhood sexual abuse and psychosis: aetiology and mechanism. Epidemiol Psichiatr Soc 2009; 18: 284–93.
9 Read J, Perry B, Moskowitz A, Connolly J. The contribution of early traumatic events to schizophrenia in some patients: a traumagenic neurodevelopmental model. Psychiatry 2001; 64: 319–45.
10 Bentall RP, Fernyhough C. Social predictors of psychotic experiences: specificity and psychological mechanisms. Schizophr Bull 2008; 34: 1012–20.
11 Read J, Hammersley P, Rudegeair T. Why, when and how to ask about child abuse. Adv Psychiatr Treat 2007; 13: 101–10.
12 NHS Confederation. Briefing 162: Implementing National Policy on Violence and Abuse. Ministry of Health, 2008.
13 Albee GW. Revolutions and counter-revolutions in prevention. Am Psychol 1996; 51: 1130–3.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 6 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 12 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 3rd January 2018 - 22nd January 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.