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Prison medicine: ethics and equivalence

  • Luke Birmingham (a1), Simon Wilson (a2) and Gwen Adshead (a3)
Summary

Guidelines for good medical practice do not reflect the complex reality of the ethical problems that arise in prison. Perhaps the best a doctor working in prison can do is realise that there are ethical dilemmas everywhere, try to recognise them and feel the tension.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Luke Birmingham, Senior Lecturer in Forensic Psychiatry, University of Southampton, Ravenswood House, Knowle, Fareham, Hampshire PO17 5NA, UK. Tel: +44 (0)1329 836 000; Fax: +44 (0)1329 834 780; e-mail: l.birmingham@soton.ac.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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British Medical Association (2001) The Medical Profession and Human Rights: A Handbook for a Changing Agenda pp. 304305. London: Zed Books.
Coid, J. (1999) Mentally abnormal prisoners on remand: I. Rejected or accepted by the NHS? BMJ, 296, 17791782.
Department of Health (2001) Report of the Working Group on Doctors Working in Prisons. London: Department of Health.
Department of Health (2005) Prison Health: Transfer of Commissioning Responsibility to PCTs. Transfer Approval Process for April 2005. London: Department of Health.
Earthrowl, M., O'Grady, J. & Birmingham, L. (2003) Providing treatment to prisoners with mental health problems. Selective literature review and expert consultation. British Journal of Psychiatry, 182, 299302.
European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (2002) The CPT standards pp. 1920. Strasbourg: Council of Europe.
Gordon, M. (1922) Penal Discipline. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Joint Prison Service and National Health Service Executive Working Group (1999) The Future Organisation of Prison Healthcare. London: Department of Health.
National Institute for Mental Health (2003) Personality Disorder: No Longer a Diagnosis of Exclusion. London: NIMH.
Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic Health Authority (2003) Independent Inquiry into the Death of David Bennett. Cambridge: Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic Health Authority.
Wilson, S. (2004) The principle of equivalence and the future of mental health care in prisons. British Journal of Psychiatry, 184, 57.
Wilson, S. & Forrester, A. (2002) Too little, too late? The treatment of mentally incapacitated prisoners. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 13, 18.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Prison medicine: ethics and equivalence

  • Luke Birmingham (a1), Simon Wilson (a2) and Gwen Adshead (a3)
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