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Psychiatric drug promotion and the politics of neoliberalism

  • Joanna Moncrieff (a1)

Summary

The pharmaceutical industry has popularised the idea that many problems are caused by imbalances in brain chemicals. This message helps to further the aims of neoliberal economic and social policies by breeding feelings of inadequacy and anxiety. These feelings in turn drive increasing consumption, encourage people to accept more pressured working conditions and inhibit social and political responses.

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References

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Psychiatric drug promotion and the politics of neoliberalism

  • Joanna Moncrieff (a1)

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