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Psychological Debriefing and Prevention of Post-Traumatic Stress

More Research is Needed

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Jonathan I. Bisson
Affiliation:
St Tydfil's Hospital, Mid Glamorgan
Martin P. Deahl*
Affiliation:
St Bartholomew's Hospital, London
*Corresponding
Dr Martin Deahl, Department of Psychological Medicine, St Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE
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Abstract

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Type
Editorials
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1994 

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