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Randomised controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy in early schizophrenia: Acute-phase outcomes

  • Shôn Lewis (a1), Nicholas Tarrier (a1), Gillian Haddock (a1), Richard Bentall (a2), Peter Kinderman (a3), David Kingdon (a4), Ronald Siddle (a5), Richard Drake (a5), Julie Everitt (a6), Karen Leadley (a7), Andy Benn (a8), Katy Grazebrook (a5), Cliff Haley (a5), Shahid Akhtar (a5), Linda Davies (a5), Steve Palmer (a9), Brian Faragher (a10) and Graham Dunn (a11)...
Abstract
Background

Cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) improves persistent psychotic symptoms.

Aims

To test the effectiveness of added CBT in accelerating remission from acute psychotic symptoms in early schizophrenia.

Method

A 5-week CBT programme plus routine care was compared with supportive counselling plus routine care and routine care alone in a multi-centre trial randomising 315 people with DSM–IV schizophrenia and related disorders in their first (83%) or second acute admission. Outcome assessments were blinded.

Results

Linear regression over 70 days showed predicted trends towards faster improvement in the CBT group. Uncorrected univariate comparisons showed significant benefits at 4 but not 6 weeks for CBTv. routine care alone on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total and positive sub-scale scores and delusion score and benefits v. supportive counselling for auditory hallucinations score.

Conclusions

CBT shows transient advantages over routine care alone or supportive counselling in speeding remission from acute symptoms in early schizophrenia.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Professor Shôn Lewis, School of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, University of Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
Footnotes
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Presented in part at the European First Episode Schizophrenia Network Meeting, Whistler BC, Canada, 28 April 2001.

Declaration of interest None.

Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Randomised controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy in early schizophrenia: Acute-phase outcomes

  • Shôn Lewis (a1), Nicholas Tarrier (a1), Gillian Haddock (a1), Richard Bentall (a2), Peter Kinderman (a3), David Kingdon (a4), Ronald Siddle (a5), Richard Drake (a5), Julie Everitt (a6), Karen Leadley (a7), Andy Benn (a8), Katy Grazebrook (a5), Cliff Haley (a5), Shahid Akhtar (a5), Linda Davies (a5), Steve Palmer (a9), Brian Faragher (a10) and Graham Dunn (a11)...
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