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What is it like to be diagnosed with bipolar illness, borderline personality disorder or another diagnosis with mood instability?

  • Robert B. Dudas (a1)
Summary

Patients with mood instability represent a significant proportion of patients with mental illness. Important lessons need to be learnt about how current assessment processes do not meet their expectations. Changes at various levels, including medical and nursing education, service provision and research priorities, appear necessary if we are to help our patients better.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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What is it like to be diagnosed with bipolar illness, borderline personality disorder or another diagnosis with mood instability?

  • Robert B. Dudas (a1)
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