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Work-related ill health in doctors working in Great Britain: incidence rates and trends

  • Anli Yue Zhou (a1), Melanie Carder (a1), Matthew Gittins (a2) and Raymond Agius (a3)
Abstract
Background

Doctors have a higher prevalence of mental ill health compared with other professional occupations but incidence rates are poorly studied.

Aims

To determine incidence rates and trends of work-related ill health (WRIH) and work-related mental ill health (WRMIH) in doctors compared with other professions in Great Britain.

Method

Incidence rates were calculated using an occupational physician reporting scheme from 2005–2010. Multilevel regression was use to study incidence rates from 2001 to 2014.

Results

Annual incidence rates for WRIH and WRIMH in doctors were 515 and 431 per 100000 people employed, respectively. Higher incidence rates for WRIH and WRMIH were observed for ambulance staff and nurses, respectively. Doctors demonstrated an annual average incidence rates increase for WRIH and WRMIH, especially in women, whereas the other occupations demonstrated a decreasing or static trend. The difference in trends between the occupations was statistically significant.

Conclusions

WRIH and WRMIH incidence rate are increasing in doctors, especially in women, warranting further research.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Anli Yue Zhou, Room C4.21, Level 4, C block, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Ellen Wilkinson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. Email: yue.zhou@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of Interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Work-related ill health in doctors working in Great Britain: incidence rates and trends

  • Anli Yue Zhou (a1), Melanie Carder (a1), Matthew Gittins (a2) and Raymond Agius (a3)
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