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Current role of service increment for teaching funding in psychiatry

  • Subodh Dave (a1), Nisha Dogra (a2) and Stuart J. Leask (a3)
Summary

Universities are the main provider of medical student education in the UK; however, its delivery, especially the clinical years but increasingly also the pre-clinical years, often takes place in National Health Service hospitals. Trusts are paid for this privilege through service increment for teaching (SIFT). Developments in clinical governance structures have meant that there is now increased scrutiny and transparency in the funding of clinical services. Lack of similarly robust educational governance structures has led to the risk of educational funds being used to deliver clinical services. This paper examines the current role of SIFT funding and the possible ways forward, using a case study.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Subodh Dave (subodh.dave@derbysmhservices.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

S.D. is a member of and N.D. is Chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Scoping Group on Undergraduate Medical Education.

Footnotes
References
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1 Department of Health. Medical Schools: Delivering Doctors of the Future. Department of Health, 2004.
2 House of Commons Health Committee. NHS Deficits: First Report of Session 2006–07. TSO (The Stationery Office), 2006.
3 Tew, J, Gell, C, Foster, S. Learning from Experience: Involving Service Users and Carers in Mental Health Education and Training. Mental Health in Higher Education, National Institute for Mental Health in England West Midlands, Trent Workforce Development Confederation, 2004.
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6 Clack, GB, Bevan, G, Eddleston, ALWF. Service increment for teaching (SIFT): a review of its origins, development and current role in supporting undergraduate medical education in England and Wales. Med Educ 1999; 33: 350–8.
7 NHS Executive. SIFT into the Future: Future Arrangements for Allocating Funds and Contracting for NHS Service Support and Facilities for Teaching Undergraduate Medical Students (Winyard Report). NHS Executive, 1995.
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13 British Medical Association Medical Academic Staff Committee. Medical Service Increment for Teaching (SIFT) Funding Report. BMA, 2007 (http://www.bma.org.uk/careers/careers_academic_medicine/SIFTfunding.jsp).
14 Karim, K, Edwards, R, Dogra, N, Anderson, I, Davies, T, Lindsay, J, et al. A survey of the teaching and assessment of undergraduate psychiatry in the medical schools of the United Kingdom and Ireland: undergraduate psychiatry: what's going on. Med Teach 2009; 31: 1024–9.
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16 Dogra, N, Edwards, R, Karim, K, Cavendish, S. Current issues in undergraduate psychiatry education: the findings of a qualitative study. Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract 2008; 13: 309–23.
17 Dogra, N. Report of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Scoping Group on Undergraduate Education in Psychiatry. Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2009 (http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pdf/Final%20Education%20in%20Psychiatry%20Scoping%20group%20report%20May%202009.pdf).
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19 Eagles, J. Should the NHS revise its role in medical student education? Scott Med J 2005; 50: 144–7.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Current role of service increment for teaching funding in psychiatry

  • Subodh Dave (a1), Nisha Dogra (a2) and Stuart J. Leask (a3)
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