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Effectiveness of group-based cognitive–behavioural therapy in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder

  • Colette Kearns (a1), Yvonne Tone (a1), Gavin Rush (a1) and James V. Lucey (a1) (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

To establish whether cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) with response and exposure prevention (ERP) is effective in individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Twenty-four patients with OCD, divided into four groups, participated in ten sessions of group CBT. All patients completed the Yale–Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Maudsley Obsessive–Compulsive Inventory (MOCI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) pre- and post-treatment.

Results

The mean (s.d.) YBOC score post-treatment was 17.1 (5.8). This was significantly lower than the mean (s.d.) YBOC pre-treatment (24.7 (6.1); t = 8.4, d.f. = 23, P < 0.005). A significant reduction was also observed in relation to all other rating scales.

Clinical implications

Cognitive–behavioural therapy for OCD delivered in a group setting is a clinically effective and acceptable treatment for patients. The use of group-based CBT is an effective means to improve access to psychotherapy.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Gavin Rush (grush@stpatsmail.com)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
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Effectiveness of group-based cognitive–behavioural therapy in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder

  • Colette Kearns (a1), Yvonne Tone (a1), Gavin Rush (a1) and James V. Lucey (a1) (a2)
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