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Enhancing the effectiveness of community drug and alcohol teams working with opioid-dependent pregnant women: results of an audit

  • Mani Sairam (a1), Rakesh Magon (a2) and Christos Kouimtsidis (a3)
Abstract
Aims and method

To evaluate the quality of services offered by community drug and alcohol teams (CDATs) to pregnant women in substitution treatment. A full audit of the practice across all local CDATs against national standards was undertaken in 2008 and 2010.

Results

Quality of services improved and met three standards in 100% and the fourth standard in 96% of cases. There was good implementation of the recommendations arising out of the action plan of the first cycle, which resulted in significant improvements in interagency liaison and risk-benefit analysis documentation within the CDATs.

Clinical implications

Management of pregnant women in substitution treatment can be improved by adhering to a multipronged approach as identified by this audit.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Christos Kouimtsidis (drckouimtsidis@hotmail.com)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

All authors were members of the Addiction Services in Hertfordshire when this audit took place.

Footnotes
References
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1 Department of Health. Statisticsfrom the Regional Drug Misuse Databases for Six Months ending March 1999 (Bulletin 1999/33). Department of Health, 1999.
2 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Results from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings. NSDUH Series H-36, HHS Publication No. SMA 09-4434. Office of Applied Studies, US Department of Health and Human Services, 2009.
3 Lewis, G. The Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health (CEMACH). Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing Maternal Deaths to Make Motherhood Safer – 2003–2005. The Seventh Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. CEMACH, 2007.
4 Klee, H. Drug-using parents: analysing the stereotypes. Int J Drug Policy 1998; 9: 437–48.
5 Brent, Kensington, Chelsea and Westminster Substance Misuse Service. Children of Substance Misusers: A Mapping Exercise for Children of Substance Misusers. Carried out within the Substance Misuse Services in the London Boroughs of Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster, Hammersmith and Fulham, and Ealing. Brent, Kensington, Chelsea and Westminster Substance Misuse Service, 2001.
6 Morrison, C, Siney, C. Maternity services for drug misusers in England and Wales: a national survey. Health Trends 1995; 27: 15–7.
7 Department of Health. 7.4 Pregnancy and neonatal care. In Drug Misuse and Dependence – UK Guidelines on Clinical Management: 8083. Department of Health, 2007.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Enhancing the effectiveness of community drug and alcohol teams working with opioid-dependent pregnant women: results of an audit

  • Mani Sairam (a1), Rakesh Magon (a2) and Christos Kouimtsidis (a3)
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