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Increasing the employment rate for people with longer-term mental health problems

  • Miles Rinaldi (a1), Tatiana Montibeller (a1) and Rachel Perkins (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To examine the effects of implementing the individual placement and support (IPS) approach within four community mental health teams (CMHTs). Demographic, clinical and vocational data were collected through a repeated cross-sectional survey. Additionally, a service user experience survey was conducted.

Results

The IPS approach appears to have a significant effect on the employment rates of service users; a higher proportion felt able to return to employment and a smaller proportion believed they were unable to work because of their mental health problems. Employment rates for service users appear to be independent of general employment rates.

Clinical implications

Implementing IPS appears to increase the employment rates in CMHTs resulting in increased service user expectations of being able to return to work.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Miles Rinaldi (miles.rinaldi@swlstg-tr.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Increasing the employment rate for people with longer-term mental health problems

  • Miles Rinaldi (a1), Tatiana Montibeller (a1) and Rachel Perkins (a1)
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eLetters

Employment and long term mental illness

MOHINDER KAPOOR, Specialty Registrar(ST6) Old Age Psychiatry
31 October 2011

Rinaldi et al 1 present an interesting paper looking at the effects of implementing the individual placement and support (IPS) approach withincommunity mental health teams (CMHTs).

I read with interest the findings of the paper. The IPS approach appeared to have had a significant effect on the employment rates of service users. The authors of the study provide relevant evidence in relation to this finding. The authors further claim that a higher proportion of service users felt able to return to employment and a smaller proportion believed they were unable to work because of their mental health problems. These findings are based on a very low response rate of service users to a questionnaire survey conducted to find out whatservice users thought about the care they received from mental health services. Only 128 service users out of 728 (17%) responded to the question about whether they had received help with finding work in the past 12 months. This points to a very high non-response rate (83%). It is quite intriguing that authors of this study make these above claims without any additional testing for non-response effects. This is even morerelevant as there is no comparison group within this study and it is possible that the changes in employment rates are the result of many factors other than the introduction of IPS. The authors should be congratulated for mentioning these short comings in this study. However, one can't ignore the fact that it is quite possible that high non-responserate might have affected the validity of the findings in this study.

Declaration of interest: none

References:1.Rinaldi M et al. Increasing the employment rate for people with longer-term mental health problems. The Psychiatrist, 2011; 35: 339 - 343.

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Conflict of interest: None declared

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