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Library use by patients in an English maximum security hospital

  • John Milton (a1) and Rosemary Ruck (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

Scant clinical attention is usually paid to (a) forensic patients' reading interests or (b) the potential that library services may offer in providing information and therapy to patients. We undertook a cross-sectional service evaluation of patients' library attendance and use at Rampton high secure hospital in a 12-month period between July 2009 and June 2010.

Results

We collected information for 326 patients across all 28 wards. Almost 79% used the library service in some way, 66% borrowing music, 67% borrowing books and some borrowing both. Factual books were borrowed more than fiction, with graphic novels, talking books and self-help books about mental disorder all proving popular.

Clinical implications

Reading and library use should be considered by clinicians in terms of the positive impact of improving literacy to enhance wider recovery, in relation to the impact of illness and medication effects on reading ability and the potential for providing health-related messages, illness education and reading therapy.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
John Milton (John.Milton@nottshc.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Library use by patients in an English maximum security hospital

  • John Milton (a1) and Rosemary Ruck (a1)
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