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Motivational reserve: does it help our understanding of cognitive impairment? Commentary on … Healthy brain ageing

  • Bob Woods (a1)
Summary

Motivational reserve is being proposed as an additional component of reserve capacities which may prevent, or ameliorate the effects of, cognitive impairment in later life. This is consistent with an understanding of the presentation of dementia which goes beyond neuropathological and neuropsychological changes. The construct may help make sense of findings relating to the potentially preventative qualities of a diverse range of ‘cognitive’ activities and of social networks, as well as of education. However, caution is required in relation to how cognitive impairment is evaluated and defined, to avoid confounds such as has been the case with level of education.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Bob Woods (b.woods@bangor.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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See special article, pp. 175–177, this issue.

Declaration of interest

B.W. is Chief Investigator for CFAS Wales, a longitudinal study of the development of cognitive impairment in later life funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales.

Footnotes
References
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1 Stern, Y. What is cognitive reserve? Theory and research application of the reserve concept. J Int Neuropsychol Soc 2002; 8: 448–60.
2 Owen, AM, Hampshire, A, Grahn, JA, et al. Putting brain training to the test. Nature 2010; 465: 775–8.
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6 Wilson, RS, Mendes De Leon, CF, Barnes, LL, Schneider, JA, Bienias, JL, Evans, DA, et al. Participation in cognitively stimulating activities and risk of incident Alzheimer disease. J Am Med Assoc 2002; 287: 742–8.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Motivational reserve: does it help our understanding of cognitive impairment? Commentary on … Healthy brain ageing

  • Bob Woods (a1)
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