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Prevalence study of head shop drug usage in mental health services

  • John Lally (a1), Emam-El Higaya (a2), Zafar Nisar (a3), Emma Bainbridge (a2) (a4) and Brian Hallahan (a2) (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and method

To examine the prevalence of head shop drug usage in individuals attending a range of adult mental health services. We examined the effect of head shop drug usage on the mental state of individuals with a range of mental health disorders. Clinical data were obtained from 608 consecutively reviewed individuals attending adult mental health services in relation to their use of head shop and psychoactive drugs and the putative effects of head shop drugs on their mental state.

Results

The prevalence of head shop drug use was 13% (n= 78), with a higher prevalence of usage noted in individuals younger than 35 years of age (25%). A large proportion of individuals (n= 41, 54%) reported adverse effects of these agents on their mental state, with psychotic symptoms being the most prevalent.

Clinical implications

Head shop drug usage was associated with a reported deleterious effect on mental state, which was particularly evident for individuals with a history of psychosis.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
John Lally (john.lally@kcl.ac.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Prevalence study of head shop drug usage in mental health services

  • John Lally (a1), Emam-El Higaya (a2), Zafar Nisar (a3), Emma Bainbridge (a2) (a4) and Brian Hallahan (a2) (a4)...
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