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Use of specialist services for obsessive–compulsive and body dysmorphic disorders across England

  • Lynne M. Drummond (a1), Naomi A. Fineberg (a2), Isobel Heyman (a3), David Veale (a3) and Edmond Jessop (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and method

In April 2007, the National Specialist Commissioning Team of the Department of Health commissioned a group of services to provide treatment to patients with the most severe and profound obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We decided to examine the usage of these services across England 4–5 years after the start of the new funding arrangements. This survey used data about patients treated in the financial year 2011–2012.

Results

Despite the services offering intensive home-based as well as residential and in-patient services, there was a greater proportion of referrals from London, the South East of England and counties closer to London.

Clinical implications

It is important that all patients, regardless of where they live, have access to highly specialist services for OCD and BDD. We discuss potential ways of improving this access but we hope this paper will act as a discussion forum whereby we can receive feedback from others.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Lynne M. Drummond (lynnemd@sgul.ac.uk)
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Declaration of interest

All authors work for the National Specialist Commissioning Team Services for OCD and BDD discussed in this article.

Footnotes
References
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1 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder: Core Interventions in the Treatment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder. British Psychological Society and Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2006.
2 Drummond, LM, Fineberg, NA, Heyman, I, Kolb, PJ, Pillay, A, Rani, S, et al. National service for adolescents and adults with severe obsessive–compulsive and body dysmorphic disorders. Psychiatr Bull 2008; 32: 333–6.
3 Goodman, WK, Price, LH, Rasmussen, SA, Mazure, C, Delgado, P, Heninger, GR, et al. The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. II. Validity. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1989; 46: 1006–11.
4 Phillips, KA, Hollander, E, Rasmussen, SA, Aronowitz, BR, DeCaria, C, Goodman, WKA. Severity rating scale for body dysmorphic disorder: development, reliability, and validity of a modified version of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. Psychopharmacol Bull 1997; 33: 1722.
5 Drummond, LM. The treatment of severe, chronic, resistant obsessive–compulsive disorder. An evaluation of an in-patient programme using behavioural psychotherapy in combination with other treatments. Br J Psychiatry 1993; 163: 223–9.
6 Drummond, LM, Pillay, A, Kolb, P, Rani, S. Specialised in-patient treatment for severe, chronic, resistant obsessive–compulsive disorder. Psychiatr Bull 2007; 31: 4952.
7 Boschen, MJ, Drummond, LM, Pillay, A. Treatment of severe, treatment refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a study of inpatient and community treatment. CNS Spectrum 2008; 13: 1056–65.
8 Boschen, MJ, Drummond, LM, Pillay, A, Morton, K. Predicting outcome of treatment for severe, treatment resistant ocd in inpatient and community settings. J Beh Ther Exp Psychiatry 2010; 41: 90–5.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Use of specialist services for obsessive–compulsive and body dysmorphic disorders across England

  • Lynne M. Drummond (a1), Naomi A. Fineberg (a2), Isobel Heyman (a3), David Veale (a3) and Edmond Jessop (a4)...
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