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Validation of the Security Needs Assessment Profile (SNAP) by a national survey of secure units in England

  • Steffan Davies (a1), Mick Collins (a2) and Chris Ashwell (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

The Security Needs Assessment Profile (SNAP) was developed to provide a detailed description of individual patient's security requirements in the then Trent Region of England. A national survey of secure units was undertaken to examine the content validity of the item structure of SNAP and revise the item definitions to reflect more broadly based clinical practice. A follow-up survey sought views on the usefulness of SNAP in clinical practice.

Results

Thirty-five secure units from National Health Service and independent sector providers participated. No new security items were generated. All the item definitions were reviewed, many amended, and a small number revised extensively. Units' security profiles were rated on the original and revised instruments.

Clinical implications

The revised SNAP has been shown to be generalisable across secure services in England; 92% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that SNAP would be useful in providing a structured security needs assessment.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Steffan Davies (Steffan.Davies@nhs.net)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

The authors have undertaken lecturing and training about the assessment of security needs and the use of SNAP (predominantly unpaid).

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
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Validation of the Security Needs Assessment Profile (SNAP) by a national survey of secure units in England

  • Steffan Davies (a1), Mick Collins (a2) and Chris Ashwell (a2)
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