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        INTRODUCTION
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Welcome to the first issue of THINK to be published by Cambridge University Press. THINK aims to bring accessible and engaging philosophy to the widest possible audience, and we believe that Cambridge University Press will prove an excellent partner in this venture.

This issue contains an interesting piece by Marc Hauser on our moral intuitions. Moral intuition is currently a focus of scientific research, and Hauser provides a concise and riveting survey both of some of the results and their implications. Indeed, Hauser suggests that “an understanding of the evolution, development, and neural substrate of this intuitive system can greatly inform, and potentially transform our legal and educational systems.” I am inclined to agree, and will be commissioning follow-up articles on this topic in future issues.

The next issue will include several pieces on the theme “Good without God”, including essays by both Richard Swinburne, Richard Norman and Simon Blackburn.