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Teleology

  • Devin Griffiths
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References
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Notes

1. Eagleton, Terry, The Illusions of Postmodernism (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1996), 108.

2. Rosenthal, Jesse, Good Form: The Ethical Experience of the Victorian Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017).

3. Levine, Caroline, Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2015); Saint-Amour, Paul K., Tense Future: Modernism, Total War, Encyclopedic Form (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015). Fredric Jameson has famously argued that we are unable to imagine a better world, and that science fiction confronts the impossibility of imagining the future in Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions (New York: Verso, 2005). To this, Kim Stanley Robinson responds, “We can imagine utopia; it's easy as pie”—it's imagining how to get there that's the dilemma—but “we have come to a moment of utopia or catastrophe; there is no middle ground. … utopia is no longer a nice idea but, rather, a survival necessity” (Remarks on Utopia in the Age of Climate Change,” Utopian Studies 27, no. 1 [2016]: 7, 10).

4. Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky, “Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, Or, You're So Paranoid, You Probably Think This Introduction Is about You,” in Novel Gazing: Queer Readings in Fiction (Durham: Duke University Press, 1997), 4.

5. Sedgwick, “Paranoid Reading,” 4.

6. Felski, Rita, “Suspicious Minds,” Poetics Today 32, no. 2 (2011): 215–34, 225.

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Victorian Literature and Culture
  • ISSN: 1060-1503
  • EISSN: 1470-1553
  • URL: /core/journals/victorian-literature-and-culture
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