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Displaced GAD65 amacrine cells of the guinea pig retina are morphologically diverse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 January 2007

YEN-HONG KAO
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6058
PETER STERLING
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6058

Abstract

The ganglion cell layer of mammalian retina contains numerous amacrine cells. Many belong to one type, the cholinergic starburst cell, but the other types have not been systematically identified. Using a new method to target sparsely represented cell types, we filled about 200 amacrine neurons in the ganglion cell layer of the guinea pig visual streak and identified 11 types. Ten of these resemble types identified in other species with somas in the inner nuclear layer, but one type has not been previously reported. Most of the types and nearly all the injected cells (95%) arborized low in the synaptic layer where they would co-stratify with various classes of ON ganglion cell. The displaced somas (7% of all amacrine cells) thus represent a heterogeneous pool, which are relatively accessible for study of their interactions with ON ganglion cells.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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