Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-s2vjv Total loading time: 0.227 Render date: 2023-02-01T22:06:06.642Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Livelihoods and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Cambodia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 December 2009

S. EAR*
Affiliation:
Department of National Security Affairs, United States Naval Postgraduate School, Code NS, Glasgow 364, 1411 Cunningham Road, Monterey, California 93943, USA
S. BURGOS CÁCERES
Affiliation:
Animal Production and Health Division; Livestock Information, Sector Analysis and Policy Branch (AGAL); Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative (PPLPI); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, Rome, Italy
*
Corresponding author: sear@nps.edu
Get access

Abstract

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) Type A subtype H5N1 is a viral zoonotic disease that has infected and killed birds and humans since late 2003. Cambodia's experience with HPAI since the disease was discovered on a farm outside Phnom Penh in January 2004 reveals important aspects of how a developing country, with limited resources and capabilities, has responded to a crisis that has global public health implications and, vice-versa, how this global response in turn affected Cambodia. Qualitative research methodologies consisting of mostly one-on-one semi-structured interviews by Sophal Ear across various government offices, the private sector and the non-governmental sectors, and online surveys sent to individuals deeply involved in HPAI work in Cambodia can render interesting insights related to livelihood issues. Results from these methodologies suggest there is a non-alignment of interests among the government, donors, implementing agencies and rural smallholder farmers that have important implications for effectiveness of disease mitigation measures and livelihood impacts.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © World's Poultry Science Association 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

BURGOS, S., HINRICHS, J., OTTE, J., PFEIFFER, D., ROLAND-HOLST, D., SCHWABENBAUER, K. and THIEME, O. (2008) Poultry, HPAI and Livelihoods in Cambodia – A Review. Pro-Poor HPAI Risk Reduction Project, FAO - PPLPI. Mekong Team Working Paper, No. 3.Google Scholar
CEDAC - CENTRE D'ETUDE ET DE DÉVELOPPEMENT AGRICOLE CAMBODGIEN, (2007) Gender and socio-economic impacts of HPAI and its control: rural livelihood and biosecurity of smallholder poultry producers and poultry value chains in Cambodia. Case study of 36 villages in four Cambodian provinces. Report commissioned by the FAO, 134 pages.Google Scholar
CENTDOR – CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT ORIENTED RESEARCH, (2008) Rural livelihoods and biosecurity of smallholder poultry producers and poultry value chain in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Report commissioned by the FAO, 75 pages.Google Scholar
CHAN, S. and EAR, S. (2004) Towards Understanding Social Protection in Cabodia. Cambodia Development Review 8(4): 9-13.Google Scholar
EAR, S. (2005) The political economy of pro-poor livestock policy. PPLPI Working Paper 26, Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 59 pages.Google Scholar
EAR, S. (2007) The political economy of aid and governance in Cambodia. Asian Journal of Political Science 15(1): 68-96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
EAR, S. (2009) Cambodia's victim zero: global and national responses to highly pathogenic avian influenza. STEPS Working Paper 16, Brighton: STEPS Centre, 102 pages.Google Scholar
HICKLER, B. (2007) Bridging the gap between HPAI awareness and practice in Cambodia: recommendations from an anthropological participatory assessment. Mission report, FAO – ECTAD.Google Scholar
LY, S., VAN KERKHOVE, M., HOLL, D., FROEHLICH, Y. and VONG, S. (2007) Interaction between humans and poultry, rural Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases 12(1): 130-132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
RICHNER, B. (2007) The dengue disaster: a mirror of the hypocrisy of the health policy for the poor world. The Cambodia Daily, Friday, July 27.Google Scholar
VAN KERKHOVE, M., LY, S., HOLL, D., GUITIAN, J., MANGTANI, P., GHANI, A. and VONG, S. (2008) Frequency and patterns of contact with domestic poultry and potential risk of H5N1 transmission to humans living in rural Cambodia. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 2(5): 155-163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
WIEGERS, E. (2008) HPAI, gender and smallholder poultry producers: viewing the linkages through a livelihood lens. Document commissioned by the FAO, 21 pages.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Livelihoods and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Cambodia
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Livelihoods and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Cambodia
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Livelihoods and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Cambodia
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *