Skip to content

All SAP systems will be unavailable on Saturday 10th December 2022 from 0800-1800 UK Time.

If you can’t place an order, please contact Customer Services to complete your order.

UK/ROW directcs@cambridge.org +44 (0) 1223 326050 | US customer_service@cambridge.org 1 800 872 7423 or 1 212 337 5000 | Australia/New Zealand enquiries@cambridge.edu.au 61 3 86711400 or 1800 005 210, New Zealand 0800 023 520

Register Sign in Wishlist

Mime, Music and Drama on the Eighteenth-Century Stage
The Ballet d'Action

£76.99

  • Date Published: July 2011
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107005495

£ 76.99
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an inspection copy?

This title is not currently available on inspection

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The 'ballet d'action' was one of the most successful and controversial forms of theatre in the early modern period. A curious hybrid of dance, mime and music, its overall and overriding intention was to create drama. It was danced drama rather than dramatic dance, musical drama rather than dramatic music. Most modern critical studies of the ballet d'action treat it more narrowly as stage dance and very few view it as part of the history of mime. Little use has previously been made of the most revealing musical evidence. This innovative book does justice to the distinctive hybrid nature of the ballet d'action by taking a comparative approach, using contemporary literature and literary criticism, music, mime and dance from a wide range of English and European sources. Edward Nye presents a fascinating study of this important and influential part of eighteenth-century European theatre.

    • Takes an innovative, comparative approach, discussing theatre, mime, dance, music and literature, as opposed to previous studies of this subject which have taken a narrow view
    • Presents an informative general introduction to certain forms of mime, as well as a specialised study of a specific form - the eighteenth-century 'ballet d'action'
    • Provides an international viewpoint, referring to publications and stage works in English, French, Italian, German and Russian
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2011
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107005495
    • length: 340 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 170 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.74kg
    • contains: 1 music example
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. The Ballet d'Action in Historical Context:
    1. The voice and the body in the enlightenment
    2. A revival of Roman pantomime?
    3. No place for harlequin
    4. Decroux and Noverre: distant cousins?
    Part II. The Ballet d'Action in Close-Up: Dramatic Principles:
    5. Character and action
    6. Dialogues in mime
    7. Choreography is painterly drama
    8. The admirable consent between music and action
    9. Putting performance into words
    Conclusions
    Appendix
    Bibliography.

  • Author

    Edward Nye, University of Oxford
    Edward Nye is Fellow of Lincoln College and Lecturer in French at the University of Oxford. His research centres on the eighteenth century and on artistic aesthetics in particular, and he is also interested in the history of ideas across centuries and national borders. He is the author of Literary and Linguistic Theories in Eighteenth-Century France (2000), the editor of a volume of literary reflections on dance, Sur Quel Pied Danser? Danse et Littérature (2005) and the editor of a scholarly anthology on the literature of cycling, A Bicyclette (2000).

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×
warning icon

Turn stock notifications on?

You must be signed in to your Cambridge account to turn product stock notifications on or off.

Sign in Create a Cambridge account arrow icon
×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×