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Look Inside Literature and Domestic Travel in Early Modern England

Literature and Domestic Travel in Early Modern England

£78.99

  • Date Published: August 2009
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521448376

£ 78.99
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About the Authors
  • In the early modern period, the population of England travelled more than is often now thought, by road and by water: from members of the gentry travelling for pleasure, through the activities of those involved in internal trade, to labourers migrating out of necessity. Yet the commonly held view that people should know their places, geographically as well as socially, made domestic travel highly controversial. Andrew McRae examines the meanings of mobility in the early modern period, drawing on sources from canonical literature and travel narratives to a range of historical documents including maps and travel guides. He identifies the relationship between domestic travel and the emergence of vital new models of nationhood and identity. An original contribution to the study of early modern literature as well as travel literature, this interdisciplinary book opens up domestic travel as a vital and previously underexplored area of research.

    • A contribution to literary studies, history and historical geography
    • Shifts attention from how the British thought of other countries to how they considered their own
    • Looks afresh at some of the best known early modern travel narratives, including Daniel Defoe and Celia Fiennes
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Literature and Domestic Travel in Early Modern England is a valuable addition to the growing body of critical work that addresses the intersection of literature, geography and the cultural impact of travel in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.' Annotated Bibliography of English Studies

    '… we must welcome a book that contains such valuable critiques of recent scholarship in economic, tourism, and landscape history, and shows such multidisciplinary engagement with varied sources.' Comparative Studies in Society and History

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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2009
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521448376
    • length: 260 pages
    • dimensions: 234 x 157 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.56kg
    • contains: 9 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Routes:
    1. Rivers
    2. Roads
    3. Inns and alehouses
    Part II. Travellers:
    4. The progress: royal travellers and common authors
    5. Tourism: Celia Fiennes and her context
    6. Traffic: John Taylor and his context
    Epilogue: Defoe's Tour
    Index.

  • Author

    Andrew McRae, University of Exeter
    Andrew McRae is Professor of Renaissance Studies in the Department of English at the University of Exeter.

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