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The Cambridge Ancient History

The Cambridge Ancient History

Volume 12. The Crisis of Empire, AD 193-337

2nd Edition

£201.00

Part of The Cambridge Ancient History

Brian Campbell, John Drinkwater, Alan K. Bowman, Averil Cameron, Elio Lo Cascio, David Ibbetson, David Johnston, John Wilkes, Jean-Michel Carrié, Mireille Corbier, Malcolm Todd, Richard N. Frye, C. S. Lightfoot, Maurice Sartre, Garth Fowden, Mark Edwards, Graeme Clarke, Janet Huskinson
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  • Date Published: September 2005
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521301992

£ 201.00
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  • This volume covers the history of the Roman Empire from the accession of Septimius Severus in AD 193 to the death of Constantine in AD 337. This period was one of the most critical in the history of the Mediterranean world. It begins with the establishment of the Severan dynasty as a result of civil war. From AD 235 this period of relative stability was followed by half a century of short reigns of short-lived emperors and a number of military attacks on the eastern and northern frontiers of the empire. This was followed by the First Tetrarchy (AD 284–305), a period of collegial rule in which Diocletian, with his colleague Maximian and two junior Caesars (Constantius and Galerius), restabilised the empire. The period ends with the reign of the first Christian emperor, Constantine, who defeated Licinius and established a dynasty which lasted for thirty-five years.

    • Offers a new perspective on the so-called 'crisis' of the Roman Empire
    • Takes full account of the most recent archaeological evidence
    • Provides a full account of the most important period in the history of Christianity and the church
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    Product details

    • Edition: 2nd Edition
    • Date Published: September 2005
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521301992
    • length: 983 pages
    • dimensions: 238 x 160 x 58 mm
    • weight: 1.545kg
    • contains: 12 b/w illus. 9 maps 3 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Part I. Narrative:
    1. The Severan dynasty Brian Campbell
    2. Maximinus to Diocletian and the 'crisis' John Drinkwater
    3. Diocletian and the first tetrarchy, 284–305 Alan K. Bowman
    4. The reign of Constantine, 306–337 Averil Cameron
    Part II. Government and Administration:
    5. The army Brian Campbell
    6. The emperor and his adminstration
    6a. General developments Elio Lo Cascio
    6b. The age of the Severans Elio Lo Cascio
    6c. The government and administration of the empire in the central decades of the third century Elio Lo Cascio
    6d. The new state of Diocletian and Constantine: from the tetrarchy to the reunification of the empire Elio Lo Cascio
    7a. High classical law David Ibbetson
    7b. Epiclassical law David Johnston
    Part III. The Provinces:
    8. Provinces and frontiers John Wilkes
    9. Developments in provincial and local administrations Jean-Michel Carrié
    10. Egypt from Septimius Severus to the death of Constantine Alan K. Bowman
    Part IV. The Economy of the Empire:
    11. Coinage and taxation: the state's point of view, 193–337 Mireille Corbier
    12. Coinage, society and economy Mireille Corbier
    Part V. The Non-Roman World:
    13. The Germanic peoples and Germanic society Malcolm Todd
    14. The Sassanians Richard N. Frye
    15. Armenia and the Eastern Marches Christopher S. Lightfoot
    16. The Arabs and the desert peoples Maurice Sartre
    Part VI. Religion, Culture and Society:
    17. Late polytheism
    17a. The world-view Garth Fowden
    17b. The individual and the gods Garth Fowden
    17c. Public religion Garth Fowden
    18a. Christianity, AD 70–192 Mark Edwards
    18B. Third-century Christianity Graeme Clarke
    23. Art and architecture, 193–337 Janet Huskinson
    Appendices to chapter 8
    Stemmata
    Chronology.

  • Editors

    Alan Bowman, Brasenose College, Oxford
    Alan Bowman is Camden Professor of Ancient History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of the British Academy. He is author of Life and Letters on the Roman Frontier (2nd edition) (Routledge, 1998) and The Cambridge Ancient History Volume XI (editor) (0521263352).

    Averil Cameron, Keble College, Oxford
    Averil Cameron is Warden of Keble College, Oxford. Her published works include The Later Roman Empire: AD 284–430 (Harvard University Press, 1993) and The Mediterranean World in Late Antiquity (Routledge, 1993).

    Peter Garnsey, University of Cambridge
    Peter Garnsey is Professor of the History of Classical Antiquity at the University of Cambridge. His previous publications include Food and Society in Classical Antiquity (0521641829) and The Evolution of the Late Antique World (with Caroline Humfress) (Orchard Academic, 2001).

    Contributors

    Brian Campbell, John Drinkwater, Alan K. Bowman, Averil Cameron, Elio Lo Cascio, David Ibbetson, David Johnston, John Wilkes, Jean-Michel Carrié, Mireille Corbier, Malcolm Todd, Richard N. Frye, C. S. Lightfoot, Maurice Sartre, Garth Fowden, Mark Edwards, Graeme Clarke, Janet Huskinson

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