Skip to content

Online ordering is currently undergoing maintenance. To place orders, please call our customer service team at +61 (03) 8671 1400. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Register Sign in Wishlist
The Social Interpretation of the French Revolution

The Social Interpretation of the French Revolution

2nd Edition

Part of The Wiles Lectures

  • Date Published: July 1999
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521667678

Paperback

Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an inspection copy?

Please email academicmarketing@cambridge.edu.au to enquire about an inspection copy of this book

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Alfred Cobban's The Social Interpretation of the French Revolution is one of the acknowledged classics of post-war historiography. This 'revisionist' analysis of the French Revolution caused a furore on first publication in 1964, challenging as it did established orthodoxies during the crucial period of the Cold War. Cobban saw the French Revolution as central to the 'grand narrative of modern history', but provided a salutary corrective to many celebrated social explanations, determinist and otherwise, of its origins and development. A generation later this concise but powerful intervention was reissued in this 1999 edition with an introduction by Gwynne Lewis, providing students with both a context for Cobban's own arguments, and assessing the course of Revolutionary studies in the wake of The Social Interpretation. This book remains a handbook of revisionism for Anglo-Saxon scholars, and is essential reading for all students of French history at undergraduate level and above.

    • A French history classic (30,000 copies sold in English of the first edition)
    • Introduction by the leading contemporary historian of the Revolutionary period
    • Still one of the most important short analyses available of one of the greatest events in human history
    • Written by a leading French historian; author of A History of Modern France (Penguin), which is still a bestseller
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'This is a provocative, lively, and well-written book, and its call for a truly modern sociology of the Revolution can only meet with general approval.' Review of Politics

    'This book will be both stimulating and challenging to all those who have so far accepted the orthodox 'bourgeois versus aristocrat' theory.' The Times Educational Supplement

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Edition: 2nd Edition
    • Date Published: July 1999
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521667678
    • length: 232 pages
    • dimensions: 213 x 140 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.29kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Introduction Gwynne Lewis
    1. The present state of history
    2. History and sociology
    3. The problem of social history
    4. The meaning of feudalism
    5. The attack on seigneurial rights
    6. Who were the revolutionary bourgeois?
    7. Economic consequences of the Revolution
    8. A bourgeoisie of landowners
    9. Country against town
    10. Social cleavages among the peasantry
    11. The sans-culottes
    12. A revolution of the propertied classes
    13. Poor against rich
    14. Conclusion
    Index.

  • Author

    Alfred Cobban

    Introduction by

    Gwynne Lewis

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×