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Immortality and the Body in the Age of Milton

$80.00 USD

Gardner Campbell, James Nohrnberg, Gordon Braden, Vera Camden, Gregory Chaplin, Stephen M. Fallon, Gregory Foran, John Rumrich, David A. Harper, Louisa Hall, Dustin Stewart, John Rogers
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  • Date Published: January 2018
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108397162

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  • Seventeenth-century England teemed with speculation on body and its relation to soul. Descartes' dualist certainty was countered by materialisms, whether mechanist or vitalist. The most important and distinctive literary reflection of this ferment is John Milton's vitalist or animist materialism, which underwrites the cosmic worlds of Paradise Lost. In a time of philosophical upheaval and innovation, Milton and an unusual collection of fascinating and diverse contemporary writers, including John Donne, Margaret Cavendish, John Bunyan, and Hester Pulter, addressed the potency of the body, now viewed not as a drag on the immaterial soul or a site of embarrassment but as an occasion for heroic striving and a vehicle of transcendence. This collection addresses embodiment in relation to the immortal longings of early modern writers, variously abetted by the new science, print culture, and the Copernican upheaval of the heavens.

    • Focuses on the body as a site or occasion of transcendence, recognizing the crucial place of embodiment in early modern theology - especially in relation to salvation
    • Cites philosophers and religious thinkers concerned with epistemology and the relationship of the subject to the world, developing the relevance of early modern philosophy and theology to contemporary phenomenology
    • Juxtaposes Milton with such contemporaries as Francis Bacon, John Donne, John Bunyan, Margaret Cavendish, and Hester Pulter, placing him in a highly pertinent, carefully defined, contemporary theological context
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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2018
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108397162
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. 1. The enfolded sublime of incarnate immortality Gardner Campbell
    2. Milton's 'Lycidas', or Edward King's two bodies James Nohrnberg
    Part II. 3. Narcissus in the boudoir: Aretino's Petrarchan postures Gordon Braden
    4. Carnality into creativity: sublimation in John Bunyan's 'Apology' to The Pilgrim's Progress Vera Camden
    5. Milton's beautiful body Gregory Chaplin
    6. The fortunate, unfortunate fall and two varieties of immortality in Paradise Lost Stephen M. Fallon
    Part III. 7. The miracle in Francis Bacon's natural philosophy Gregory Foran
    8. Flesh made word: pneumatology and Miltonic textuality John Rumrich
    9. Milton beyond iconoclasm David A. Harper
    Part IV. 10. Hester Pulter's brave new worlds Louisa Hall
    11. Death-weddings or living books: Cavendish rewriting Donne Dustin Stewart
    12. Paradise Lost and the creation of Mormon theology John Rogers.

  • Editors

    John Rumrich, University of Texas, Austin
    John Rumrich is A. J. and W. D. Thaman Professor of English at the University of Texas, Austin. He has written monographs on John Milton, Matter of Glory: A New Preface to 'Paradise Lost' (1987) and Milton Unbound: Controversy and Reinterpretation (Cambridge, 1996), and he has co-edited several editions of Milton's works for Modern Library (with Stephen M. Fallon and William Kerrigan) as well as the Norton Critical Edition: Seventeenth-Century British Poetry, 1603–1660 (2005, with Gregory Chaplin). In 2013 he was named an Honored Scholar of the Milton Society.

    Stephen M. Fallon, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
    Stephen M. Fallon is John J. Cavanaugh Professor of the Humanities at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Milton among the Philosophers: Poetry and Materialism in Seventeenth-Century England (1991) and Milton's Peculiar Grace: Self-Representation and Authority (2000), and has co-edited Modern Library's Milton editions (with William Kerrigan and John Rumrich). In 2011 he was named an Honored Scholar of the Milton Society and subsequently served as the Society's president.

    Contributors

    Gardner Campbell, James Nohrnberg, Gordon Braden, Vera Camden, Gregory Chaplin, Stephen M. Fallon, Gregory Foran, John Rumrich, David A. Harper, Louisa Hall, Dustin Stewart, John Rogers

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