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Shakespeare's Two Playhouses
Repertory and Theatre Space at the Globe and the Blackfriars, 1599–1613

£75.00

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  • Date Published: August 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107190160

£ 75.00
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Description
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About the Authors
  • In what ways did playwrights like Shakespeare respond to the two urban locations of the Globe and the Blackfriars? What was the effect of their different acoustic and visual experiences on actors and audiences? What did the labels 'public' for the Globe and 'private' for the Blackfriars, actually mean in practice? Sarah Dustagheer offers the first in-depth, comparative analysis of the performance conditions of the two sites. This engaging study examines how the social, urban, sensory and historical characteristics of these playhouses affected dramatists, audiences and actors. Each chapter provides new interpretations of seminal King's Men's works written as the company began to perform in both settings, including The Alchemist, The Tempest and Henry VIII. Presenting a rich and compelling account of the two early modern theatres, the book also suggests fresh insights into recent contemporary productions at Shakespeare's Globe, London and the new Sam Wanamaker Playhouse.

    • The first book-length study to analyse the key differences in performance conditions between Shakespeare's two playhouses: the Globe and the Blackfriars Theatres
    • Examines early modern drama in relation to contemporary reconstructions of Shakespeare's playhouses, including the new Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, and so constitutes one of the first publications to discuss its recent productions
    • Uniquely combines two recent exciting trends in the study of early modern drama - repertory studies and spatial theory - to offer an engaging and dynamic argument
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    Awards

    • Short-listed, 2018 Shakespeare's Globe Book Award

    Reviews & endorsements

    'With its emphasis on the experience of playgoing in early modern London and its sensitivity to spatial dynamics, this is an exciting and eminently readable contribution to theatre history, which will go straight onto my students' reading lists.' Pascale Aebischer, University of Exeter

    '… the book as a whole offers a helpful introduction to the theatres of early modern London and how spaces are shaped, legitimized, disturbed and re-imagined by the art that authorizes them.' Charlotte Scott, Shakespeare Survey

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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2017
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107190160
    • length: 236 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.46kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Social space
    2. Urban space
    3. Playing space
    4. Haunted space
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Sarah Dustagheer, University of Kent, Canterbury
    Sarah Dustagheer is Lecturer in Early Modern Literature at the School of English, University of Kent, Canterbury. She has delivered public talks at the National Theatre, the Royal Opera House and The Marlowe Theatre. She is also a member of Shakespeare's Globe Architecture Research Group, tasked with advising on the maintenance of the Globe and the construction of the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse.

    Awards

    • Short-listed, 2018 Shakespeare's Globe Book Award

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