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Astrochemistry VII (IAU S332)

Astrochemistry VII (IAU S332)
Through the Cosmos from Galaxies to Planets

£95.00

Part of Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union Symposia and Colloquia

Ewine van Dishoeck, Manuel Aravena, Sergio Martin, Takashi Shimonishi, Javier Goicoechea, Nanase Harada, Suzanne Madden, Jonathan Tan, Gary Fuller, Yoko Oya, Al Wootten, John Black, Harvey Liszt, Maryvonne Gerin, Hans Zinnecker, Herma Cuppen, Leen Decin, Thomas Henning, Rob Garrod, Els Peeters, Allan Cheung, Arnaud Belloche, Merel van't Hoff, Satoshi Yamamoto, Jes Jorgensen, Pedro Garcia-Lario, Brett McGuire, Kenji Furuya, Kathrin Altwegg, Vianney Taquet, Martin Cordiner, Maria Drozdovskaya, Eva Wirstrom, Karin Oberg, Ke Zhang, Ilse Cleeves, Stefano Facchini, Catherine Walsh, Melissa McClure, Simon Casassus, Viviana Guzman, Ruud Visser, Mark Hollands, Mohamad Ali-Dib, Nikku Madhusudhan, Stefanie Milam, Oscar Morata, Pierre Cox, Sergio Pilling, Susanna Widicus-Weaver, Sean Ayling, Ilsa Cooke, Lisseth Gavilan, Ian Sims, Chris Arumainayagam, Ewen Campbell
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  • Publication planned for: October 2018
  • availability: Not yet published - available from October 2018
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107192577

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About the Authors
  • The study of astrochemistry has become an important branch of modern astronomy and astrophysics. Molecules are key tools in exploring topics such as star and planet formation, the origin and evolution of interstellar dust grains, the structure of the interstellar medium in galaxies, and the origin of protogalaxies in the early Universe. This volume contains review papers alongside the latest results in the fast-growing discipline of astrochemistry, bringing together contributions from observers, modellers and laboratory astrochemists. It reports results from new observational facilities, such as the Herschel Space Observatory, ALMA, NOEMA, Rosetta and SOFIA, which are leading to new research areas such as the habitability of exoplanets, the origin of prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology. Interleaved with these observation results is the recent, ground-breaking work of physical chemists and numerical modellers, which provides the fundamental theoretical descriptions required to explain the molecular Universe.

    • Provides an excellent graduate-level introduction to the molecular universe
    • Brings together astronomical observations with laboratory astrochemistry, helping to forge links between these formerly disparate disciplines
    • Covers many broad and active areas of research, such as star and planet formation, interstellar dust grains, the interstellar medium in galaxies, and protogalaxies in the early Universe
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: October 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107192577
    • dimensions: 255 x 179 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.89kg
    • availability: Not yet published - available from October 2018
  • Table of Contents

    Opening address
    1. Atoms and molecules at high redshifts
    2. Ultra-luminous extragalactic chemistry
    3. Observations of a hot molecular core in a low metallicity dwarf galaxy
    4. The ALMA view of UV-irradiated molecular cloud edges
    5. High-temperature chemistry in external galaxies
    6. Low metallicity ISM: physical properties of the gas and dust
    7. Fire from Ice – massive star birth from infrared dark clouds
    8. Tracing the evolution of massive protostars
    9. Chemical change in the disk forming region of IRAS 16293-2422 studied with ALMA
    10. A molecular outflow-prestellar core interaction in L1689N
    11. The excitation and emission spectrum of the hydrogen molecular ion
    12. The molecular inventory of diffuse clouds
    13. Barnard 1b
    14. Astrochemistry of light hydrides with SOFIA
    15. Theoretical approaches to surface chemistry
    16. Molecule and dust formation in late-type stars
    17. Dust formation at cryogenic temperatures
    18. Simulations of branched carbon-chain chemistry in star-forming regions
    19. The photochemical evolution of the interstellar PAH family
    20. Laboratory astrochemistry
    21. Exploring molecular complexity in the Galactic Center with ALMA
    22. Imaging the water snowline in protostellar envelopes
    23. Chemical tracers of dynamics in low-mass protostellar objects
    24. Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)
    25. Herschel observations of molecular emission lines in low- and intermediate-mass evolved stars
    26. Interstellar reaction screening via microwave spectral taxonomy
    27. Isotopic fractionation in interstellar molecules
    28. Insights into astrochemistry – highlights from the Rosetta mission
    29. On the origin of O2, N2, and other volatile species in comets
    30. ALMA observations of Titan's atmospheric chemistry and seasonal variation
    31. The chemical connection between 67P/C-G and IRAS16293
    32. Nitrogen fractionation in star-forming regions and primitive Solar System materials
    33. Spatially resolved organic chemistry in protoplanetary disks
    34. Unveiling the mid-plane temperature and mass distribution in the giant-planet formation zone
    35. Zooming in on the physics and chemistry of protoplanetary disks with ALMA
    36. Different dust and gas radial extents in protoplanetary disks
    37. ALMA detection of gas-phase methanol in a planet-forming disk
    38. Measuring gas masses and carbon depletion in young disks
    39. Dust in transition disks
    40. Nitrogen fractionation in protoplanetary disks from the H13CN/HC15N ratio
    41. Models of nitrogen isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks
    42. Chemistry and evolution of the oldest white dwarf planetary systems
    43. What does the chemical composition of giant planets tells us about their formation?
    44. Chemical characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres
    45. JWST: the role of observing facilities in setting the agenda
    46. ALMA Band 1 and astrochemistry
    47. ALMA
    48. Processing of interstellar ices by soft X-rays and swift ions
    49. Laboratory measurements of methanol photolysis branching ratios to guide astrochemical models
    50. Acetaldehyde and carbonaceous dust
    51. Photodestruction of astrophysically relevant ice species
    52. Synchrotron X-ray irradiation of N-rich organics
    53. Gas phase studies of astrochemical importance
    54. Photochemistry and radiation chemistry of cosmic ice analogs of ammonia.

  • Editors

    Maria Cunningham, University of New South Wales, Sydney

    Tom Millar, Queen's University Belfast

    Yuri Aikawa, University of Tokyo

    Contributors

    Ewine van Dishoeck, Manuel Aravena, Sergio Martin, Takashi Shimonishi, Javier Goicoechea, Nanase Harada, Suzanne Madden, Jonathan Tan, Gary Fuller, Yoko Oya, Al Wootten, John Black, Harvey Liszt, Maryvonne Gerin, Hans Zinnecker, Herma Cuppen, Leen Decin, Thomas Henning, Rob Garrod, Els Peeters, Allan Cheung, Arnaud Belloche, Merel van't Hoff, Satoshi Yamamoto, Jes Jorgensen, Pedro Garcia-Lario, Brett McGuire, Kenji Furuya, Kathrin Altwegg, Vianney Taquet, Martin Cordiner, Maria Drozdovskaya, Eva Wirstrom, Karin Oberg, Ke Zhang, Ilse Cleeves, Stefano Facchini, Catherine Walsh, Melissa McClure, Simon Casassus, Viviana Guzman, Ruud Visser, Mark Hollands, Mohamad Ali-Dib, Nikku Madhusudhan, Stefanie Milam, Oscar Morata, Pierre Cox, Sergio Pilling, Susanna Widicus-Weaver, Sean Ayling, Ilsa Cooke, Lisseth Gavilan, Ian Sims, Chris Arumainayagam, Ewen Campbell

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