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The Coalition Effect, 2010–2015

£19.99

Anthony Seldon, Mike Finn, Martin Loughlin, Cal Viney, Neil McGarvey, Peter Riddell, Philip Cowley, Paul Johnson, Daniel Chandler, Dieter Helm, Julian Glover, Tony Travers, Alan Smithers, Howard Glennerster, Nicholas Timmins, Michael Clarke, Julie Smith, Rosie Campbell, Sarah Childs, Rory Coonan, Philip Norton, Guy Lodge, Illias Thoms, Peter Preston, John Curtice
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  • Date Published: March 2015
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107440180

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About the Authors
  • The British general election of May 2010 delivered the first coalition government since the Second World War. David Cameron and Nick Clegg pledged a 'new politics' with the government taking office in the midst of the worst economic crisis since the 1930s. Five years on, a team of leading experts drawn from academia, the media, Parliament, Whitehall and think tanks assesses this 'coalition effect' across a broad range of policy areas. Adopting the contemporary history approach, this pioneering book addresses academic and policy debates across this whole range of issues. Did the coalition represent the natural 'next step' in party dealignment and the evolution of multi-party politics? Was coalition in practice a historic innovation in itself, or did the essential principles of Britain's uncodified constitution remain untroubled? Fundamentally, was the coalition able to deliver on its promises made in the coalition agreement, and what were the consequences - for the country and the parties - of this union?

    • Considers the distinctive effects of the coalition government on politics
    • Sets the context for debates on Britain's role in Europe, the health of parliamentary democracy, the impact of austerity and the prospects for the economy, the future of the welfare state, and the changing nature of political parties
    • Combines scholarly rigour with the insider knowledge of practitioners and prominent commentators, ensuring credibility and accessibility to a broad audience
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'An absorbing, rich and indispensable book for all who seek a dispassionate assessment of the achievements and failures of the coalition government.' Sir Ivor Crewe, Master of University College, Oxford

    'A collection of superb insights by first-class writers that everybody interested in this coalition - and others that may follow it - should read.' Matthew d'Ancona, author of In It Together, and Guardian columnist

    'Anyone interested in the coalition and what it has meant for Britain ought to read this considered, insightful and comprehensive assessment.' Andrew Rawnsley, author of Servants of the People and The End of the Party

    'Everyone has an opinion about the coalition government; here, as much as is possible, are the facts.' New Statesman

    'A hefty volume of 23 essays by a distinguished range of experts on many aspects of the past five years of coalition government.' Financial Times

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2015
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107440180
    • length: 642 pages
    • dimensions: 230 x 155 x 30 mm
    • weight: 1.02kg
    • contains: 10 b/w illus. 17 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    David Cameron as Prime Minister, 2010–15: the verdict of history Anthony Seldon
    Part I. The Coalition and the Government of Britain:
    1. The coming of the coalition and the Coalition Agreement Mike Finn
    2. The coalition and the constitution Martin Loughlin and Cal Viney
    3. The coalition beyond Westminster Neil McGarvey
    4. The coalition and the executive Peter Riddell
    5. The coalition and Parliament Philip Cowley
    Part II. The Coalition and Policy:
    6. The coalition and the economy Paul Johnson and Daniel Chandler
    7. The coalition and energy policy Dieter Helm
    8. The coalition and infrastructure Julian Glover
    9. The coalition and society (I): home affairs and local government Tony Travers
    10. The coalition and society (II): education Alan Smithers
    11. The coalition and society (III): health and long-term care Howard Glennerster
    12. The coalition and society (IV): welfare Nicholas Timmins
    13. The coalition and foreign affairs Michael Clarke
    14. Europe: the coalition's poisoned chalice Julie Smith
    15. 'What the coalition did for women': a new gender consensus, coalition division and gendered austerity Rosie Campbell and Sarah Childs
    16. The coalition and culture: 'bread, circuses and Britishness' Rory Coonan
    Part III. The Coalition and Political Culture:
    17. The coalition and the Conservatives Philip Norton
    18. The coalition and the Liberal Democrats Mike Finn
    19. The coalition and the Labour Party Guy Lodge and Illias Thoms
    20. The coalition and the media Peter Preston
    21. The coalition, elections and referendums John Curtice
    Part IV. Conclusion:
    22. Conclusion: the net coalition effect Mike Finn.

  • Editors

    Anthony Seldon, Wellington College, Berkshire
    Anthony Seldon is a leading contemporary historian and political commentator, and the thirteenth Master of Wellington College. A Fellow of King's College London, he has authored or edited over thirty-five books on contemporary history and politics. With Peter Hennessy, he co-founded the Institute of Contemporary British History, now part of King's College London. This is the eighth 'Effect' book he has edited.

    Mike Finn, Liverpool Hope University
    Mike Finn is Director of the Centre for Education Policy Analysis and Lecturer in the History of Education at Liverpool Hope University. He has taught history and politics at a number of institutions, including as a Research Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, and as a Bye-Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge. In 2006 he was Head of Research and political speechwriter to the Leader of the Liberal Democrats during the transition from Charles Kennedy to Ming Campbell. In 2001 he won the Palgrave/Times Higher Education Humanities and Social Sciences writing prize. A former Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University, he is the editor of The Gove Legacy: Education in Britain after the Coalition (2015).

    Contributors

    Anthony Seldon, Mike Finn, Martin Loughlin, Cal Viney, Neil McGarvey, Peter Riddell, Philip Cowley, Paul Johnson, Daniel Chandler, Dieter Helm, Julian Glover, Tony Travers, Alan Smithers, Howard Glennerster, Nicholas Timmins, Michael Clarke, Julie Smith, Rosie Campbell, Sarah Childs, Rory Coonan, Philip Norton, Guy Lodge, Illias Thoms, Peter Preston, John Curtice

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