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State Building in Putin’s Russia
Policing and Coercion after Communism

£82.00

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  • Date Published: May 2011
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521760881

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About the Authors
  • This book argues that Putin's strategy for rebuilding the state was fundamentally flawed. Taylor demonstrates that a disregard for the way state officials behave toward citizens - state quality - had a negative impact on what the state could do - state capacity. Focusing on those organizations that control state coercion, what Russians call the 'power ministries', Taylor shows that many of the weaknesses of the Russian state that existed under Boris Yeltsin persisted under Putin. Drawing on extensive field research and interviews, as well as a wide range of comparative data, the book reveals the practices and norms that guide the behavior of Russian power ministry officials (the so-called siloviki), especially law enforcement personnel. By examining siloviki behavior from the Kremlin down to the street level, State Building in Putin's Russia uncovers the who, where and how of Russian state building after communism.

    • Only detailed study of Vladimir Putin's efforts to strengthen the Russian state that covers his entire presidency
    • First major single-author study on Russian law enforcement after the Soviet collapse
    • Makes an important contribution to the comparative politics literature on the state by developing the distinction between state capacity and state quality
    • Draws on more than 100 interviews in Russia
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    Awards

    • A Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2011

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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2011
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521760881
    • length: 392 pages
    • dimensions: 242 x 165 x 26 mm
    • weight: 0.73kg
    • contains: 34 b/w illus. 2 maps 15 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Bringing the gun back in: coercion and the state
    2. The power ministries and the siloviki
    3. Coercion and capacity: political order and the central state
    4. Coercion and capacity: centralization and federalism
    5. Coercion and quality: power ministry practices and personnel
    6. Coercion and quality: the state and society
    7. Coercion in the North Caucasus
    8. State capacity and quality reconsidered.

  • Author

    Brian D. Taylor, Syracuse University, New York
    Brian D. Taylor is Associate Professor of Political Science in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Previously, he served as Assistant Professor at the University of Oklahoma. He earned his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1998 and holds a Master's of Science from the London School of Economics and a BA from the University of Iowa. He is a 2011 Fulbright Scholar to Russia and was a Carnegie Scholar from 2002 to 2003. He was also a Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University. He is the author of Politics and the Russian Army: Civil-Military Relations, 1689–2000, and his work has appeared in Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, Europe-Asia Studies, the International Studies Review, Survival, Millennium and the Journal of Cold War Studies.

    Awards

    • A Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2011

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