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Art in Bourgeois Society, 1790–1850

Art in Bourgeois Society, 1790–1850

Andrew Hemingway, Ann Pullan, Greg Smith, Kay Dian Kriz, Thomas Gretton, Alex Potts, Richard Wrigley, Helen Weston, Andrew C. Shelton, William Vaughan, Frank Büttner, Werner Busch, Françoise Forster-Hahn, Alan Wallach, Patricia Hills, Angela Miller
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  • Date Published: June 1998
  • availability: Unavailable - out of print September 2016
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521551823

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  • The relationship between art and class was a central concern of the 'New Art History' of the 1970s. However, the political shifts of the 1980s together with the vogue for Poststructuralist theory have worked to marginalise class analysis in the humanities. This collection, edited by Andrew Hemingway (The Norwich School of Painters, 1803–33, Landscape Imagery and Urban Culture in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain), and William Vaughan (Romantic Art, German Romanticism and English Art, German Romantic Painting), is intended to reassert its importance both through a reconsideration of the status of Marxism after the fall of Communism, and through concrete studies of artistic practices in the key phase of bourgeois history from 1790 to 1850. An international group of contributors reflect the inherently international nature of capitalism through studies of related developments in four societies, namely Britain, France, Germany, and the United States.

    • Reasserts the value of class analysis in art history
    • Approaches art in bourgeois society as an international phenomenon
    • Concerned with institutions, patronage, art criticism, and specific artworks
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 1998
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521551823
    • length: 386 pages
    • dimensions: 256 x 181 x 31 mm
    • weight: 1.177kg
    • contains: 73 b/w illus.
    • availability: Unavailable - out of print September 2016
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: Marxism and art history after the fall of Communism Andrew Hemingway
    Part I. Britain: Introduction Andrew Hemingway
    1. Public goods or private interests? The British institution in the early nineteenth century Ann Pullan
    2. The watercolour as commodity: the exhibitions of the Society of Painters in Watercolours, 1805–1812 Greg Smith
    3. French glitter or English nature? Representing Englishness in landscape painting, c. 1790–1820 Kay Dian Kriz
    4. 'Art is cheaper and goes lower in France': the language of the Parliamentary Select Committee on the Arts and Principles of Design of 1835–6 Thomas Gretton
    5. The impossible ideal: romantic conceptions of the Parthenon sculptures in early nineteenth-century Britain and Germany Alex Potts
    Part II. France: Introduction Andrew Hemingway
    6. The class of '89?: cultural aspects of Bourgeois identity in the aftermath of the French Revolution Richard Wrigley
    7. Working for a Bourgeois republic: Prud'hon, patronage and the distribution of wealth under the Directoire and Consulate Helen Weston
    8. 'Les marchands sont plus que jamais dans le temple': the revival of monumental decorative painting in France during the July monarchy Andrew C. Shelton
    Part III. Germany: Introduction William Vaughan
    9. Correcting Friderich (Friedrich)
    Nature and society in post-Napoleonic Germany William Vaughan
    10. The frescoes of Peter Cornelius in the Munich Ludwigskirche and contemporary criticism Frank Büttner
    11. Conservatism and innovation in Moritz von Schwind Werner Busch
    12. The German experience of 1848: imaging the Vormärz, the revolution and its aftermath Françoise Forster-Hahn
    Part IV. United States: Introduction Andrew Hemingway
    13. Long-term visions, short-term failures: art institutions in the United States 1800–1860 Alan Wallach
    14. The American art-union as patron for expansionist ideology in the 1840s Patricia Hills
    15. Landscape taste as an indicator of class identity in Antebellum America Angela Miller.

  • Authors

    Andrew Hemingway, University College London

    William Vaughan, Birkbeck College, University of London

    Contributors

    Andrew Hemingway, Ann Pullan, Greg Smith, Kay Dian Kriz, Thomas Gretton, Alex Potts, Richard Wrigley, Helen Weston, Andrew C. Shelton, William Vaughan, Frank Büttner, Werner Busch, Françoise Forster-Hahn, Alan Wallach, Patricia Hills, Angela Miller

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