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Aristotle on Time
A Study of the Physics

  • Date Published: July 2013
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107678781

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  • Aristotle's definition of time as 'a number of motion with respect to the before and after' has been branded as patently circular by commentators ranging from Simplicius to W. D. Ross. In this book Tony Roark presents an interpretation of the definition that renders it not only non-circular, but also worthy of serious philosophical scrutiny. He shows how Aristotle developed an account of the nature of time that is inspired by Plato while also thoroughly bound up with Aristotle's sophisticated analyses of motion and perception. When Aristotle's view is properly understood, Roark argues, it is immune to devastating objections against the possibility of temporal passage articulated by McTaggart and other 20th-century philosophers. Roark's novel and fascinating interpretation of Aristotle's temporal theory will appeal to those interested in Aristotle, ancient philosophy and the philosophy of time.

    • Presents a comprehensive interpretation of Aristotle's views concerning the nature of time
    • Draws on Aristotle's views concerning perception and cognition, appealing to scholars with interests in the De Anima and Parva Naturalia
    • Relates Aristotle's temporal theory to twentieth-century work in the philosophy of time
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Tony Roark's Aristotle on Time is an excellent book - resourceful, powerfully argued, and pleasing to read. The hylomorphic analysis of time it defends is new and challenging. Everyone interested in Aristotle's theoretical philosophy - indeed, everyone interested in the metaphysics of time - should read it.' C. D. C. Reeve, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    'Aristotle on Time is an insightful work from which readers will certainly take away something valuable. Indeed, Roark has done a marked service by giving new life to a classical (even if forgotten) interpretation of Aristotle.' Jon McGinnis, Philosophy in Review

    'The progression of the argument is careful and logical, the depth and breadth of Roark's analysis is courageous and penetrating, and some tracts of the argument are deliciously incisive.' The Muse

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2013
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107678781
    • length: 248 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 13 mm
    • weight: 0.34kg
    • contains: 7 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Introduction
    Part I. Times New and Old:
    1. McTaggart's systems
    2. Countenancing the Doxai
    Part II. The Mater of Time: Motion:
    3. Time is not motion
    4. Aristotelian motion (Kinesis)
    5. 'The before and after in motion'
    Part III. The Form of Time: Perception:
    6. Number (Arithmos) and perception (Aisthesis)
    7. On a moment's notice
    8. The role of imagination
    9. Time and the common perceptibles
    10. The hylomorphic interpretation illustrated
    Part IV. Simultaneity and Temporal Passage:
    11. Simultaneity and other temporal relations
    12. Temporal passage
    13. Dissolving the puzzles of IV.10
    14. Concluding summary and historical significance
    Bibliography.

  • Author

    Tony Roark, Boise State University, Idaho
    Tony Roark is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Boise State University. His work has appeared in journals such as Mind, Ancient Philosophy, Apeiron and History and Philosophy of Logic.

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