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Travel and Drama in Early Modern England
The Journeying Play

$105.00

Claire Jowitt, David McInnis, Anthony Parr, Ladan Niayesh, Steve Mentz, Julie Sanders, Andrew Gordon, Marianne Montgomery, Daniel Vitkus, Richmond Barbour, Bernhard Klein, Emily C. Bartels, Clare McManus
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  • Date Published: October 2018
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108471183

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About the Authors
  • This agenda-setting volume on travel and drama in early modern England provides new insights into Renaissance stage practice, performance history, and theatre's transnational exchanges. It advances our understanding of theatre history, drama's generic conventions, and what constitutes plays about travel at a time when the professional theatre was rapidly developing and England was attempting to announce its presence within a global economy. Recent critical studies have shown that the reach of early modern travel was global in scope, and its cultural consequences more important than narratives that are dominated by the Atlantic world suggest. This collection of essays by world-leading scholars redefines the field by expanding the canon of recognized plays concerned with travel. Re-assessing the parameters of the genre, the chapters offer fresh perspectives on how these plays communicated with their audiences and readers.

    • Re-assess what constitutes early modern travel and in doing so expands the canon of recognized plays concerned with travel
    • Provides insight into how plays concerned with travel communicated with their audiences and readers at a time of expanding cultural, political and economic horizons
    • Includes analysis from world leading scholars in the field of plays about travel
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Travel and Drama in Early Modern England manages to be at once unified and multifocal.' Cecilia Lindskog Whiteley, Notes and Queries

    '… this important volume presents a broad discussion about travel on the early modern stage, fittingly for a subject that evoked such different emotions and was an emblem for so many different things.' Cecilia Lindskog Whiteley, Notes and Queries

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108471183
    • length: 284 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.54kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: understanding the early modern journeying play Claire Jowitt and David McInnis
    1. 'For his travailes let the Globe witnesse': venturing on the stage in early modern England Anthony Parr
    2. Seeing and overseeing the stage as map in Early Modern drama Ladan Niayesh
    3. Marlowe's Mediterranean and counter-epic forms of oceanic hybridity Steve Mentz
    4. Making the land known: Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2 and the literature of perambulation Julie Sanders
    5. Eastward Ho and the traffic of the stage Andrew Gordon
    6. Language and seafaring in Thomas Middleton and John Webster's Anything for a Quiet Life Marianne Montgomery
    7. Rogue cosmopolitans on the Early Modern stage: John Ward, Thomas Stukeley, and the Sherley brothers Daniel Vitkus
    8. Drama at sea: a new look at Shakespeare on the Dragon, 1607–8 Richmond Barbour and Bernhard Klein
    9. Strange bedfellows: the ordinary undersides of 'a true reportory' and The Tempest Emily C. Bartels
    10. Travelling characters in early modern drama David McInnis
    11. 'Constant changelings', theatrical form, and migration: stage travel in the early 1620s Clare McManus
    12. The uses of cultural encounter in Sir William Davenant's Caroline-to-Restoration voyage drama Claire Jowitt.

  • Editors

    Claire Jowitt, University of East Anglia
    Claire Jowitt is Associate Dean for Research in Arts and Humanities and Professor of English and History at the University of East Anglia. She is author of Voyage Drama and Gender Politics, 1589–1642 (2003) and The Culture of Piracy: English Literature and Seaborne Crime 1580–1630 (2010).

    David McInnis, University of Melbourne
    David McInnis is the Gerry Higgins Senior Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Melbourne. He is author of Mind-Travelling and Voyage Drama in Early Modern England (2011) and co-editor (with Matthew Steggle) of Lost Plays in Shakespeare's England (2014).

    Contributors

    Claire Jowitt, David McInnis, Anthony Parr, Ladan Niayesh, Steve Mentz, Julie Sanders, Andrew Gordon, Marianne Montgomery, Daniel Vitkus, Richmond Barbour, Bernhard Klein, Emily C. Bartels, Clare McManus

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