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Edward I and the Governance of England, 1272–1307

Part of Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series

  • Date Published: November 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108441216

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  • This important exploration of the reign of Edward I – one of England's most lionised, feared and successful monarchs – presents his kingship in a radical new light. Through detailed case studies of Shropshire, Warwickshire and Kent, Caroline Burt examines how Edward's governance at a national level was reflected in different localities. She employs novel methodology to measure levels of disorder and the effects of government action, and uncovers a remarkably sophisticated approach to governance. This study combines an empirical examination of government with an understanding of developing political ideas and ideological motivation, and contributes towards a greater understanding of the development of local government and politics in England in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Edward emerges as a king with a coherent set of ideas about the governance of his realm, both intellectually and practically, whose achievements were even more remarkable than has previously been recognised.

    • Radically revises our understanding of Edward I's kingship
    • Proposes a new view of the nature of governance in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries
    • Employs a novel methodology to measure levels of disorder and the effects which government action had on it
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Burt provides a compelling and persuasive alternate view of Edward I as a ruler who was motivated by principle, and who was convinced of his duty to care for the common good … In addition to its considerable value for specialists, this book also will be accessible to students. Burt's clear and precise prose, as well as her efforts to clarify technical matters of law and governmental organization, make this text highly suitable for graduate courses as well as for upper division undergraduate courses in the history of medieval England, medieval law, and medieval government.' David Bachrach, The Medieval Review

    'A positive re-evaluation of Edward based on a detailed assessment of the localities that demonstrates the importance of royal government there for growing order after the disruption of Henry III's later years. Burt argues that Edward's engagement with internal rule was critical and that he was able to offer a coherent set of beliefs about kingship. Moreover, although he proved unwilling in his later years to accept ideas about political consultation, he is seen as innovative and conceptually creative. A valuable and impressive work.' The Historical Association

    'An examination of how Edward's governance at national level was reflected in different localities. The approach is mainly chronological, with general discussion of ideas of kingship and governance, and the text is largely based on evidence from Shropshire, Warwickshire and Kent.' Northern History

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2017
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108441216
    • length: 314 pages
    • dimensions: 230 x 152 x 16 mm
    • weight: 0.47kg
    • contains: 9 b/w illus. 9 maps 16 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of maps
    List of tables
    List of figures
    Acknowledgements
    List of abbreviations
    Introduction
    Part I. Context:
    1. Royal government
    2. Political ideas
    3. The localities: Shropshire, Warwickshire and Kent
    Part II. Chronology:
    4. Edward: the apprenticeship, 1254–72
    5. 1272–7
    6. 1278–85
    7. 1286–93
    8. 1294–1301
    9. 1302–7
    Conclusion
    Appendix: tables and figures
    Bibliography.

  • Author

    Caroline Burt, University of Cambridge
    Caroline Burt is Fellow, Admissions Tutor and College Lecturer in History at Pembroke College, University of Cambridge.

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