Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Technology in the Industrial Revolution

£18.99

Part of New Approaches to the History of Science and Medicine

  • Date Published: January 2020
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781316637463

£ 18.99
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Request inspection copy

Lecturers may request a copy of this title for inspection

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Technological change is about more than inventions. This concise history of the Industrial Revolution places the eighteenth-century British Industrial Revolution in global context, locating its causes in government protection, global competition, and colonialism. Inventions from spinning jennies to steam engines came to define an age that culminated in the acceleration of the fashion cycle, the intensification in demand and supply of raw materials and the rise of a plantation system that would reconfigure world history in favour of British (and European) global domination. In this accessible analysis of the classic case of rapid and revolutionary technological change, Barbara Hahn takes readers from the north of England to slavery, cotton plantations, the Anglo-Indian trade and beyond - placing technological change at the centre of world history.

    • Offers an accessible and concise history of the classic case of rapid and revolutionary technological change
    • Explains the relationship between technological and social change in simple terms
    • Places the technologies of the Industrial Revolution in their global settings
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'Barbara Hahn boldly reframes the story of the profound economic, social, and cultural changes that transformed northern England between the 1760s and the 1840s. By emphasizing networks and systems rather than men and machines she forces us to see the world of the Industrial Revolution anew. We are all in Hahn's debt for this splendid new study.' Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    'In this exciting introduction to the Industrial Revolution, Barbara Hahn lucidly and elegantly shows that multiple contexts - local, regional and global - shaped the development of technology in Britain. A perfect text for undergraduates.' Prasannan Parthasarathi, Boston College

    'A much-needed, long-awaited, and deeply engaging contribution to our difficult conversations about the 'Industrial Revolution'. Barbara Hahn provides a masterful account of peoples, machines, productions, consumptions, cultures, and the state, weaving together very local, very global, traditional, revisionist, and contested stories. We are lucky to have this book available now.' Heidi Voskuhl, University of Pennsylvania

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2020
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781316637463
    • length: 236 pages
    • dimensions: 227 x 152 x 12 mm
    • weight: 0.4kg
    • contains: 21 b/w illus. 1 map
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Sugar and spice
    2. Myths and machines
    3. Cottonopolis
    4. Power and the people
    5. The vertical mill.

  • Author

    Barbara Hahn, Texas Tech University
    Barbara Hahn is a prize-winning author in business history and the history of technology. Her publications include Plantation Kingdom: The South and Its Global Commodities (2016), which she co-authored. She is Associate Professor of History at Texas Tech University and was the associate editor of the journal Technology and Culture.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×