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The Economic Accomplices to the Argentine Dictatorship
Outstanding Debts

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Horacio Verbitsky, Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky, Naomi Roht-Arriaza, Leigh A. Payne, Gabriel Pereira, Mariana Heredia, Jorge E. Taiana, Eduardo M. Basualdo, Alfredo F. Calcagno, International Commission of Jurists Expert Panel, Agustín Cavana, Leonardo Filippini, Victoria Basualdo, Tomás Ojea Quintana, Carolina Varsky, Victorio Paulón, Alejandra Dandan, Hannah Franzki, Héctor Recalde, Martín Schorr, Mario Rapoport, Alfredo Zaiat, Federico Delgado, Andrea Gualde, Damián Loreti, Claudio Tognonato
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  • Publication planned for: December 2018
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107534742

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About the Authors
  • Much has been written on the Argentine dictatorship and the transitional justice movement that brought its members to justice. However there has been no study to date of the economic accomplices to this dictatorship and the recent advancements in Argentina towards holding these actors accountable. What was the role of banks, companies, and individuals in perpetuating a murderous regime? To what extent should they be held responsible? As the first academic study on economic complicity in Argentina, this book attempts to answer these questions. Renowned human rights scholars investigate the role played by such actors as Ford, Mercedes Benz, the press, foreign banks, and even the Catholic Church. Across numerous case studies, the authors make a compelling argument for the legal responsibility of economic accomplices. A groundbreaking interdisciplinary study, this book will be essential to anyone interested in transitional justice, business, and human rights.

    • The first academic study on economic complicity under an authoritarian government
    • A rich source of case studies on authoritarian complicity involving Ford and Mercedes Benz, Argentinian media companies, foreign financiers, and the Catholic Church
    • Proposes a robust theoretical framework for studying economic complicity in the context of authoritarian regimes
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: December 2018
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107534742
    • length: 416 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 mm
    • contains: 11 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: state terrorism and the economy: from Nuremberg to Buenos Aires Horacio Verbitsky and Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky
    Part I. Past and Present Economic Complicity:
    1. Why was the economic dimension missing for so long in transitional justice? An exploratory essay Naomi Roht-Arriaza
    2. Accountability for corporate complicity in human rights violations: Argentina's transitional justice innovation? Leigh A. Payne and Gabriel Pereira
    Part II. Theoretical Framework and International Dimension:
    3. Economic ideas and power during the dictatorship Mariana Heredia
    4. Foreign powers, economic support, and geopolitics Jorge E. Taiana
    Part III. The Macroeconomics of the Dictatorship:
    5. The legacy of the dictatorship. The new pattern of capital accumulation, deindustrialization, and the decline of the working class Eduardo M. Basualdo
    6. Public finances Alfredo F. Calcagno
    7. Complicity of the lenders Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky
    Part IV. Complicity and the Law:
    8. Corporate complicity and legal accountability. Report of the International Commission of Jurists International Commission of Jurists Expert Panel
    9. Corporate responsibility for complicity. International and local perspectives Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky
    10. Statute of limitations on actions for complicity Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky, Agustín Cavana and Leonardo Filippini
    Part V. Company Ordered Disappearances:
    11. The cases of Ford and Mercedes Benz Victoria Basualdo, Tomás Ojea Quintana and Carolina Varsky
    12. Acindar and Techint. Extreme militarization of labor relations Victorio Paulón
    13. Between historical analysis and legal responsibility: the Ledesma case Alejandra Dandan and Hannah Franzki
    14. Contributions to the analysis of the role of labor leadership in worker repression in the 1970s Victoria Basualdo
    15. Suppression of workers rights Héctor Recalde
    Part VI. Industrial and Agricultural Businesss Associations: Complicity and Benefits:
    16. Industrial economic power as promoter and beneficiary of Argentina's refounding project (1976–83) Martín Schorr
    17. The complicity of the agricultural business chambers Mario Rapoport and Alfredo Zaiat
    Part VII. Illegal Appropriation of Companies:
    18. Organized pillaging Federico Delgado
    19. The National Securities Commission and the assault on 'economic subversion' Alejandra Dandan
    20. The Papel Prensa case. Notes for a study Andrea Gualde
    Part VIII. A Range of Generous and Interested Supports:
    21. The media: uniform discourse and business deals under cover of state terrorism Damián Loreti
    22. The price of the Church's blessing Horacio Verbitsky
    23. The hidden Italy connection Claudio Tognonato
    24. The lawyers. From repression to neoliberalism Horacio Verbitsky
    Conclusion: outstanding debts to settle. Work agenda Horacio Verbitsky and Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky.

  • Editors

    Horacio Verbitsky, Center for Legal and Social Studies, Buenos Aires
    Horacio Verbitsky is President of Argentina's Center for Legal and Social Studies (CELS). He is a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and of the Board of Human Rights Watch Americas. Author of twenty-one books that have had a strong impact on the public agenda, he has been named as the best journalistic anchorman on Argentine television.

    Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky, United Nations Human Rights Council, Geneva
    Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky is the United Nations Independent Expert on Foreign Debt and Human Rights. A doctor in law with wide experience in international relations and litigation, he is the author of numerous books and articles on sovereign financing, economic complicity and human rights.

    Contributors

    Horacio Verbitsky, Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky, Naomi Roht-Arriaza, Leigh A. Payne, Gabriel Pereira, Mariana Heredia, Jorge E. Taiana, Eduardo M. Basualdo, Alfredo F. Calcagno, International Commission of Jurists Expert Panel, Agustín Cavana, Leonardo Filippini, Victoria Basualdo, Tomás Ojea Quintana, Carolina Varsky, Victorio Paulón, Alejandra Dandan, Hannah Franzki, Héctor Recalde, Martín Schorr, Mario Rapoport, Alfredo Zaiat, Federico Delgado, Andrea Gualde, Damián Loreti, Claudio Tognonato

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