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The Intangible Economy
How Services Shape Global Production and Consumption

Part of Development Trajectories in Global Value Chains

Deborah K. Elms, Arian Hassani, Patrick Low, Christopher Findlay, Maria Joy V. Abrenica, Sherry Stephenson, Anne-Katrin Pfister, Gloria O. Pasadilla, Julia Puspadewi Tijaja, Dev Nathan, Sandip Sarkar, Balwant Singh Mehta, Pradeep Mukherji, Chirag Rawat, Denise Cheung, David Sit
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  • Date Published: March 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108402651

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About the Authors
  • The Intangible Economy: How Services Shape Global Production and Consumption studies aspects of the role of services in development as well as on particular sectoral issues, always with policy considerations lurking not far from the analysis. The volume highlights the evolution and significance of services in the global economy, including as a vehicle for development. It discusses the major pillars that hold the services infrastructure together, namely, its governance and financing mechanisms. Other chapters adopt more specific geographical or sectoral perspectives, including a regional study of the impact of services in economic integration in ASEAN; a country-level analysis of the role of services in economic and social upgrading in India; a look at industry-specific dynamics through the business process outsourcing model; and finally, a value chain view to understand how services are impacted on a granular or micro level by policies.

    • Provides comprehensive explanations of the nature of services and how they enter the global economy
    • Considers the role of services in development, with particular focus on Asia
    • Provides practical sector-specific illustrations of how services contribute to the economy, including in finance, business services, and telecommunications
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2017
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108402651
    • length: 206 pages
    • dimensions: 227 x 152 x 12 mm
    • weight: 0.27kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures, Tables and boxes
    Acknowledgments
    1. Introduction Deborah K. Elms, Arian Hassani and Patrick Low
    2. Contextualizing services in the world economy Patrick Low and Arian Hassani
    3. Services and development: priorities for reform Christopher Findlay
    4. Gainfully linking into global value chains: a middle-income country's perspective Maria Joy V. Abrenica
    5. Who governs global value chains? Sherry Stephenson and Anne-Katrin Pfister
    6. Supply chain finance Gloria O. Pasadilla
    7. Services and economic integration in ASEAN Julia Puspadewi Tijaja
    8. Indian IT firms: the push for innovation Dev Nathan, Sandip Sarkar and Balwant Singh Mehta
    9. Leveraging business process outsourcing for growth Pradeep Mukherji and Chirag Rawat
    10. Services in global value chains and the impact of policy Denise Cheung and David Sit
    Index.

  • Editors

    Deborah K. Elms, Asian Trade Centre, Singapore
    Deborah K. Elms is Founder and Executive Director of the Asian Trade Centre, Singapore. She is also a senior fellow in the Singapore Ministry of Trade and Industry's Trade Academy. Her research interests are negotiations and decision making, and her current research involves the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) negotiations and global value chains.

    Arian Hassani, Fung Global Institute, Hong Kong
    Arian Hassani is currently based in Hong Kong where she covers J. P. Morgan's philanthropic activities across ASEAN and Australia, focusing on job creation and poverty alleviation. She has over fourteen years of experience as an international development professional. Before joining J. P. Morgan, Arian managed Fung Global Institute's (FGI) research on Asian finance, supply chains, governance, and sustainability.

    Patrick Low, Fung Global Institute, Hong Kong
    Patrick Low is Visiting Professor and Director of the Asia Global Institute's Asia Global Fellows Programme at Hong Kong University. From 1997 to 2013, he was Chief Economist at the World Trade Organization and a senior research economist at the World Bank from 1990 to 1994, where he worked on trade issues, trade and environment, fiscal policy and governance in customs administrations.

    Contributors

    Deborah K. Elms, Arian Hassani, Patrick Low, Christopher Findlay, Maria Joy V. Abrenica, Sherry Stephenson, Anne-Katrin Pfister, Gloria O. Pasadilla, Julia Puspadewi Tijaja, Dev Nathan, Sandip Sarkar, Balwant Singh Mehta, Pradeep Mukherji, Chirag Rawat, Denise Cheung, David Sit

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