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Learning Scientific Programming with Python

  • Date Published: February 2016
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107428225
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  • Learn to master basic programming tasks from scratch with real-life scientifically relevant examples and solutions drawn from both science and engineering. Students and researchers at all levels are increasingly turning to the powerful Python programming language as an alternative to commercial packages and this fast-paced introduction moves from the basics to advanced concepts in one complete volume, enabling readers to quickly gain proficiency. Beginning with general programming concepts such as loops and functions within the core Python 3 language, and moving onto the NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib libraries for numerical programming and data visualisation, this textbook also discusses the use of IPython notebooks to build rich-media, shareable documents for scientific analysis. Including a final chapter introducing challenging topics such as floating-point precision and algorithm stability, and with extensive online resources to support advanced study, this textbook represents a targeted package for students requiring a solid foundation in Python programming.

    • Assumes no prior knowledge or experience of programming
    • Online resources include sample data sets, solutions and tutorial materials for those looking for advanced study
    • Using scientifically relevant and practical examples throughout enables students to quickly put their knowledge into practice
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'This book is well illustrated and is supported by an extensive collection of resources online in the book's website, scipython.com. This site has code listings and solutions to exercises. I would readily recommend this book to any student (or even a colleague) who wishes to achieve a solid foundation in Python programming.' Vasudevan Lakshminarayanan, Contemporary Physics

    Customer reviews

    07th Dec 2017 by Jkider

    This is a complete book with wonderful examples and explanations. We use it in our Simulation class to help the students.

    Review was not posted due to profanity

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2016
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107428225
    • length: 458 pages
    • dimensions: 247 x 174 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.9kg
    • contains: 93 b/w illus. 52 tables 150 exercises
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. The core Python language I
    3. Interlude: simple plotting with pylab
    4. The core Python language II
    5. IPython and IPython notebook
    6. NumPy
    7. Matplotlib
    8. SciPy
    9. General scientific programming
    Appendix A. Solutions
    Index.

  • Resources for

    Learning Scientific Programming with Python

    Christian Hill

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  • Author

    Christian Hill, University College London
    Christian Hill is a physicist and physical chemist at University College London and the University of Oxford. He has over twenty years' experience of programming in the physical sciences and has been programming in Python for ten years. His research uses Python to produce, analyse, process, curate and visualise large data sets for the prediction of the properties of planetary atmospheres.

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