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The GCC States: National Development Records

The GCC States: National Development Records
Defence
12 Volume Hardback Set

$5,580.00 (R)

Cambridge Archive Editions
  • Date Published: March 1994
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Multiple copy pack
  • isbn: 9781852075002

$5,580.00 (R)
Multiple copy pack

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About the Authors
  • These 8000 pages provide historical evidence for the origins and development of defensive capability in the Gulf States and the material reveals the early independence and strength of Saudi Arabia as distinct from the Gulf States. The documents, all taken from the British Government archives in London, examine local security issues in detail throughout the period, including facilities and arrangements during World War II. There is extensive information about the origins and development of local levy forces in Bahrain, Muscat and the Trucial States and about the emergence of independent armed strength in Saudi Arabia, Oman and Kuwait. Information is included on the sources of military administration, institutions and traditions owed originally to British influence and the increasing power and influence of the USA.

    • Facsimile collections of key documents from archive sources
    • Previously unknown or fragmented material now available in a coherent collection
    • Carefully selected and edited for maximum value to researchers and scholars
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 1994
    • Format: Multiple copy pack
    • Isbn: 9781852075002
    • Length: 8000 pages
    • Dimensions: 585 x 405 x 200 mm
    • Weight: 20kg
    • Availability: In stock
    • Paper: Printed on acid free paper
    • Binding: Library bindings with gilt finish
    • Resume


      As part of the three set series on the development of the GCC states this set contains documentary evidence for the origins and expansion of defence capacity within the Gulf States and Saudi Arabia in the formative years of the 20th century. These 8000 pages provide historical evidence for the origins and development of defensive capability in the Gulf States and the material reveals the early independence and strength of Saudi Arabia as distinct from the Gulf States.

      The documents, all taken from the British Government archives in London, examine local security issues in detail throughout the period, including facilities and arrangements during World War II. There is extensive information about the origins and development of local levy forces in Bahrain, Muscat and the Trucial States; and about the emergence of independent armed strength in Saudi Arabia, Oman and Kuwait. Information is included on the sources of military administration, institutions and traditions owed originally to British influence and the increasing power and influence of the USA.

    • Historical Overview


      These volumes establish a collection of primary documents relating to the evolution of regional and local defence resources in the six member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council: Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. Throughout the period of the collection, from the 1920s to the early 1960s, the records reflect the independent status of Saudi Arabia and its markedly lesser degree of military dependence on Britain. The records indicate to some extent the rapid development of U.S. influence in Saudi Arabia.

      Otherwise the collection traces the involvement of Britain with the defensive interests of the Gulf states according to their differing internal situations and treaty obligations. The general background to the volumes is inevitably formed by the evolving picture of British defence policy in the Middle East, accompanied by the emergence of local security resources in individual states as they follow increasingly separate lines of development in the post-war period.

      The period covered by the collection begins and ends with British preoccupations over the protection of Kuwait initially in the 1920s, leading to difficulty over conflicting commitments to Ibn Saud; and at the time of Kuwaiti independence in 1961, when the requirement for action against the Iraqi threat conflicted with earlier reassessments indicating a reduced British presence in the Gulf.

      The British defence role in the Gulf in the 1950s, as expressed by the Ministry of Defence, was specifically articulated to protect oil field interests while preserving a strong echo of imperial strategy along the route to India:
      " Our responsibilities in the Persian Gulf are the protection of British lives and property in the oilfields, the maintenance of the security of our staging posts and the honouring of our treaty obligations to the local Shaikhdoms." [from PRO:DEFE 5/54; Joint Planning Staff paper, 13 August 1954.]

      The documents examine local security issues in detail throughout the period, including facilities and arrangements during World War II. There is extensive information about the origins and development of local levy forces in Bahrain, Muscat and the Trucial States; and about the emergence of independent armed strength in Saudi Arabia, Oman and Kuwait in particular. The records also reveal much about the organisation and administration of security affairs, some of these arrangements being destined to survive long into the modern period of independence and affluence.

    • Arrangement of Volumes

      CONTENTS OUTLINE

      General Policy For Persian Gulf Defence

      Reports on Committee of Imperial Defence, 1928
      Cabinet war measures for Persian Gulf, 1939
      Defence of Gulf by flying boats, 1940
      Oil denial schemes, 1942
      Concept of an Arab army, 1951
      Suez crisis and response, 1956
      Bahrain

      Naval support for Ruler, 1923
      Bahrain State Police and civil defence plans, 1930
      Royal Air Force use Manama and Muharraq, 1934
      Protection of Bahrain refinery, 1939-1942
      Formation of Local Defence Volunteers, 1940
      Riots, intervention of British troops, 1956
      Kuwait
      Defence of Kuwait tribes from Akhwan raids, 1927
      Strategic planning, 1939
      Arms imports, 1948
      Re-organisation of Kuwait Army, 1954
      Defence of Kuwait oil reserves, 1956
      Purchase of armaments from UK, 1960
      Qatar
      British support for Ruler's authority, 1932
      Disturbances in Doha, 1952
      Defence scheme for Qatar, 1955
      Protection of Qatar oil, 1956
      Training and weapons for Qatar police, 1959
      Sale of arms to Qatar, 1959/1963
      Muscat & Oman
      Creation and structure of Muscat Levies, 1920
      Support for Sultan against Sur insurgents, 1928
      Strategic significance of Masirah, 1944
      Sultan's Huqf Force, 1952-1953
      Offensive against insurgents; movements of Oman Liberation Army, 1957
      Re-organisation of Muscat armed forces, 1957
      Trucial States
      Royal Air Force agreements with Dubai and Abu Dhabi, 1933-1935
      Defence of Dubai jetty and Sharjah fort, 1939
      Dubai-Abu Dhabi war, 1950
      Formation of Trucial Oman levies, 1949-1953
      Arms traffic in Dubai, 1955
      Trucial Oman Scouts, 1959
      Future of Sharjah airfield, 1959
      Saudi Arabia
      Proposals for Hejaz-Nejd air force, 1929
      Organisation of Ibn Saud's armed forces, 1929
      Appointment of Chief of Military Staff, 1938
      Bombing attack on Dhahran, 1940
      US proposals for air base at Dhahran, 1944-1945
      Re-organisation of Saudi army, 1948 & 1952
      US and UK training of Saudi forces, 1950s

  • Editor

    A. Burdett

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