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Hormones, Cognition and Dementia
State of the Art and Emergent Therapeutic Strategies

£79.99

Mark A. Espeland, Sally A. Shumaker, Patricia E. Hogan, Susan M. Resnick, Stephan Bandelow, Victor W. Henderson, Robert B. Wallace, Laura H. Coker, Eef Hogervorst, Claudia H. Kawas, María M. Corrada, Annlia Paganini-Hill, Robert B. Gibbs, Roberta Diaz Brinton, Carey E. Gleason, Whitney Wharton, Cynthia M. Carlsson, Sanjay Asthana, Jin Li, Farook Al-Azzawi, Liqin Zhao, Christian J. Pike, Jenna C. Carroll, Bevin N. Powers, Katherine E. Williams, Tonita E. Wroolie, Anna Khaylis, Natalie L. Rasgon, Linda Kushandy, Wita Angrianni, Yudarini Sabarinah, Theresia Ninuk, Vita Priantina Dewi, Amina Yesufu, Tony Sadjimim, Philip Kreager, Tri Budi W. Rahardjo, Oliver T. Wolf, Chris Talbot, Robert G. Struble, Mary E. McAsey, Donald Lehmann, Barbara B. Sherwin, Monique M. Cherrier, Scott D. Moffat, Pauline M. Maki, Majon Muller, Mirjam I. Geerlings, Emily R. Rosario, Gemma Casadesus, Kathryn J. Bryan, George Perry, Mark A. Smith, Giuseppe Verdile, Ralph N. Martins, Wulf H. Utian
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  • Date Published: September 2009
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521899376

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About the Authors
  • A decade ago, oestrogen-containing hormone therapy was viewed as a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of dementia and age-related cognitive decline. However, treatment trials in women with Alzheimer's disease showed that oestrogens did not reverse cognitive impairment, and clinical trials in healthy older women indicated that oestrogens did not prevent cognitive decline. The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study trial even suggested an increased risk of dementia with treatment late in life. What happened? How are we to understand these findings? What are the implications for middle-aged and older women? What about testosterone, and what about men? And where do we go from here? This book brings together world-renowned experts in basic and clinical research on sex steroids, aging, and cognition to integrate existing findings with emerging new data, and offer challenging hypotheses on these key issues.

    • Includes a comprehensive overview of current research into sex hormones; gives the reader a state-of-the-art perspective, ranging from cell culture to clinical trials
    • Provides a multi-disciplinary approach; allows scientists and clinicians from different backgrounds to gain insight from other disciplines
    • Summarizes the research and attempts to provide consensus; gives readers perspective on the many conflicting results that have been published
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… an excellent book for understanding where the field stands today regarding sex hormones for the treatment of brain aging and dementia.' Doody's

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2009
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521899376
    • length: 292 pages
    • dimensions: 252 x 192 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.8kg
    • contains: 12 b/w illus. 4 colour illus. 9 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Part I. Estrogens and Cognition:
    1. Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) program
    2. Identifying risk-factors for cognitive change in the Women's Health Initiative
    3. Estrogen therapy – relationship to longevity and prevalent dementia in the oldest-old
    4. The critical window hypothesis: hormone exposures and cognitive outcomes after menopause
    5. Animal studies that support estrogen effects on cognitive performance and the cholinergic basis of the critical period hypothesis
    Part II. Varieties of Estrogenic Therapy:
    6. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action through regulating glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function
    7. Alternative estrogenic treatment regimes and the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study-Cognitive and Affective Substudy (KEEPS-CA)
    8. The use of transdermal 17-estradiol in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease
    9. Alternative modes of treatment: pulsatile estradiol treatment
    10. In search of estrogen alternatives for the brain
    Part III. Potential Modulators and Modifiers of Estrogenic Effects:
    11. Progesterone regulation of neuroprotective estrogen actions
    12. Clinical data of estrogen's effects in the central nervous system
    13. Different forms of soy processing may determine the positive or negative impact on cognitive function of Indonesian elderly
    14. Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in aging women
    Part IV. Possible Genetic Factors Related to Hormone Treatment Effects:
    15. Possible genetic polymorphisms related to sex steroid metabolism and dementia in women
    16. Genetics related to sex steroids: implications for Alzheimer's disease
    17. Apolipoprotein E, hormone therapy and neuroprotection
    18. Testosterone, gonadotrophins and genetic polymorphisms in men with Alzheimer's disease
    Part V. Testosterone, Estradiol and Men, and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin:
    19. Androgens and cognitive functioning in women
    20. The role of estradiol in testosterone treatment
    21. Endogenous testosterone levels and cognitive aging in men
    22. Clinical trials and neuroimaging studies of testosterone in men: insights into effects on verbal memory
    23. Testosterone therapy and Alzheimer's disease: potential for treatment and prevention in women
    24. Endogenous estradiol and dementia in elderly men: the roles of vascular risk, sex hormone binding globulin, and aromatase activity
    25. Testosterone regulates Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis
    Part VI. Gonadotropin Effects:
    26. Involvement of gonadotropins in cognitive function: implications for Alzheimer's disease
    27. The role of gonadotropins and testosterone in the regulation of beta amyloid metabolism
    28. Epilogue
    29. Concluding remarks
    Index.

  • Editors

    Eef Hogervorst, Loughborough University
    Eef Hogervorst is Professor of Biological Psychology, Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; Visiting Senior Research Fellow, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, UK; Visiting Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Respati, Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Victor W. Henderson, Stanford University, California
    Victor W. Henderson is Professor of Health Research & Policy (Epidemiology) and of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, USA.

    Robert B. Gibbs, University of Pittsburgh
    Robert B. Gibbs is Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

    Roberta Diaz Brinton, University of Southern California
    Roberta Diaz Brinton is Professor of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

    Contributors

    Mark A. Espeland, Sally A. Shumaker, Patricia E. Hogan, Susan M. Resnick, Stephan Bandelow, Victor W. Henderson, Robert B. Wallace, Laura H. Coker, Eef Hogervorst, Claudia H. Kawas, María M. Corrada, Annlia Paganini-Hill, Robert B. Gibbs, Roberta Diaz Brinton, Carey E. Gleason, Whitney Wharton, Cynthia M. Carlsson, Sanjay Asthana, Jin Li, Farook Al-Azzawi, Liqin Zhao, Christian J. Pike, Jenna C. Carroll, Bevin N. Powers, Katherine E. Williams, Tonita E. Wroolie, Anna Khaylis, Natalie L. Rasgon, Linda Kushandy, Wita Angrianni, Yudarini Sabarinah, Theresia Ninuk, Vita Priantina Dewi, Amina Yesufu, Tony Sadjimim, Philip Kreager, Tri Budi W. Rahardjo, Oliver T. Wolf, Chris Talbot, Robert G. Struble, Mary E. McAsey, Donald Lehmann, Barbara B. Sherwin, Monique M. Cherrier, Scott D. Moffat, Pauline M. Maki, Majon Muller, Mirjam I. Geerlings, Emily R. Rosario, Gemma Casadesus, Kathryn J. Bryan, George Perry, Mark A. Smith, Giuseppe Verdile, Ralph N. Martins, Wulf H. Utian

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