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Conflict and Consensus in Early Greek Hexameter Poetry

$105.00 (C)

Johannes Haubold, Barbara Graziosi, Oliver Thomas, Adrian Kelly, Jon Hesk, Donald Lavigne, Jim Marks, Lilah Grace Canevaro, Paola Bassino
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  • Date Published: May 2017
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107175747

$ 105.00 (C)
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  • Achilles inflicts countless agonies on the Achaeans, although he is supposed to be fighting on their side. Odysseus' return causes civil strife on Ithaca. The Iliad and the Odyssey depict conflict where consensus should reign, as do the other major poems of the early Greek hexameter tradition: Hesiod's Theogony and the Homeric Hymns describe divine clashes that unbalance the cosmos; Hesiod's Works and Days stems from a quarrel between brothers. These early Greek poems generated consensus among audiences: the reason why they reached us is that people agreed on their value. This volume, accordingly, explores conflict and consensus from a dual perspective: as thematic concerns in the poems, and as forces shaping their early reception. It sheds new light on poetics and metapoetics, internal and external audiences, competition inside the narrative and competing narratives, local and Panhellenic traditions, narrative closure and the making of canonical literature.

    • The first comprehensive analysis of themes central to the early Greek hexameter tradition
    • Focuses on issues of poetics and metapoetics
    • Contributes to our understanding of the processes of reception and canonisation of early Greek epic poetry
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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2017
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107175747
    • length: 238 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.46kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Gods:
    1. Conflict, consensus and closure in Hesiod's Theogony and Enūma eliš Johannes Haubold
    2. Divine conflict and the problem of Aphrodite Barbara Graziosi
    3. Sparring partners: fraternal relations in the Homeric Hymn to Hermes Oliver Thomas
    Part II. Heroes:
    4. Achilles in control? Managing oneself and others in the funeral games Adrian Kelly
    5. Uncertainty and the possibilities of violence: the quarrel in Odyssey 8 Jon Hesk
    6. ΙΡΟΣ ΙΑΜΒΙΚΟΣ: archilochean Iambos and the Homeric poetics of conflict Donald Lavigne
    7. Conflict and consensus in the epic cycle Jim Marks
    Part III. Men:
    8. Fraternal conflict in Hesiod's Works and Days Lilah Grace Canevaro
    9. On constructive conflict and disruptive peace: the Certamen Homeri et Hesiodi Paola Bassino.

  • Editors

    Paola Bassino, University of Winchester
    Paola Bassino is Lecturer in Classical Studies at the University of Winchester. She has published articles on the biographical tradition of the Greek epic poets, and is the author of a forthcoming edition and commentary of the Certamen Homeri et Hesiodi. Her current research includes a study of the interactions between the Sophists and the epic tradition and of the Renaissance reception of Homer.

    Lilah Grace Canevaro, University of Edinburgh
    Lilah Grace Canevaro is Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Classics at the University of Edinburgh. She is the author of Hesiod's Works and Days: How to Teach Self-Sufficiency (2015) and has published articles on Hesiod, Homer, Old Norse didactic, Victorian poetry and art, and cognitive approaches to poetry. She is currently working on a book about women and objects in Greek epic.

    Barbara Graziosi, University of Durham
    Barbara Graziosi is Professor of Classics and Head of Department at the University of Durham. She has published extensively on ancient Greek literature and culture, including most recently The Gods of Olympus: A History (2013) and Homer (2016). She recently completed a research project, funded by the European Research Council, on visual and narrative portraits of ancient Greek and Roman poets.

    Contributors

    Johannes Haubold, Barbara Graziosi, Oliver Thomas, Adrian Kelly, Jon Hesk, Donald Lavigne, Jim Marks, Lilah Grace Canevaro, Paola Bassino

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