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The Roads of Chinese Childhood
Learning and Identification in Angang

$61.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology

  • Date Published: June 2006
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521026567

$ 61.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Children in the Taiwanese fishing community of Angang have their attention drawn, consciously and unconsciously, to various forms of identification through their participation in schooling, family life and popular religion. In particular they learn about the family-based cycle of reciprocity, and the tension between this and the commitment to the nation. Charles Stafford's study explores absorbing issues related to nurturance, education, family, kinship and society in its analysis of how children learn to be, or not to be, both familial and Chinese.

    • First anthropological monograph focused on education and learning in China
    • Will appeal to a broad readership interested in China, childhood, education, kinship and religion
    • Written in a jargon-free and highly accessible style
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Stafford is to be congratulated for bringing original insights into the key question of what Taiwanese children learn and how they learn it. Taiwan/China specialists, comparative students of childhood experience, and those seeking a clear, lively recent survey of working-class life in rural taiwan will find this an attractive book." American Journal of Sociology

    "A particular strength of the book is its description of how traditional Confucian values of filial piety are taught and learned....this book is definetly worth close study. The novice to Chinese culture, as well as those scholars who specialize in China, will find much of interest and importance in this work." Nancy Abelmann, American Anthropologist

    "The comparative notes to childhood oin northeastern China which form the epilogue are particularly insightful. This book will prove valuable to scholars and students of all cultures because of its concise study of the way children are given an introduction and education into their religious and traditional background." Linda L. Lam-Easton, Religious Studies Review

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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2006
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521026567
    • length: 236 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 x 16 mm
    • weight: 0.369kg
    • contains: 15 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of illustrations
    Preface
    Acknowledgements
    Part I. Background: Introduction:
    1. Two roads
    Part II. Angang:
    2. Ghosts are not connexions
    3. The proper way of being a person
    4. Textbook mothers and frugal children
    5. Red envelopes and the cycle of yang
    6. Going forward bravely
    7. Divining children
    8. Dangerous rituals
    9. Conclusion
    Part III. Epilogue:
    10. Notes on childhood in northeastern China
    Notes
    Glossary
    References
    Index.

  • Author

    Charles Stafford, University of Cambridge

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